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Chinchilla 1887 and 88

GOLD!!!, fossils; electorate of Chinchilla; grapes

Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Tuesday 13 March 1888, page 6


COUNTRY MAILS.

The Dalby Herald has been informed by a gentleman from Chinchilla that splendid specimens of gold have been discovered near Hawk-wood. He stated that a Mr. Sparks, a member of a prospecting party of eight, had brought into Chinchilla some fine specimens of stone showing splendid gold, obtained near Hawk-wood." He also stated that a prospecting claim in the locality of Hawkwood (about 110 miles from Dalby) had been sold for £150. It has also been rumoured that gold has been discovered near Rawbelle station. He said he had seen and read correspondence of a most reliable nature that had been bout in by the prospectors. The Herald adds:-" While we are on the " golden subject" we may state that of our own knowledge we are aware that application has been made for several mineral' rights to prospect in a locality about seventy miles from Dalby, and we have also heard that a good sample of tin has been brought in from a short distance from Dalby."

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Queensland Figaro and Punch (Brisbane, Qld. : 1885 - 1889), Saturday 7 April 1888, page 2


To Correspondents.

F, Hogg (Chinchilla) sends two samples—one for assay and one for testing. The sample No. 1 (for assay) consisted of quartz, and one ton of it contains 5dwt of gold. The sample No. 2 (for testing) contained copper, and proved itself far more auriferous than No. 1.

K. THEODORE STAIGER.

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Tuesday 10 April 1888, page 6


COUNTRY MAILS.

SOUTHERN AND WESTERN DISTBIOTS.

A correspondent writing to the Dalby Herald, says:-The rush to the Hawkwood locality has now set in in earnest. A sudden demand for miners' rights has sprung up at the Dalby Court House, which unfortunately could not be supplied, Dalby not as yet having been proclaimed a mining district, the applicants being directed either to Eidsvold or Toowoomba. Several parties, well equipped and backed up by some tradesmen, have also started during the week for Hawkwood, and ere long something more tangible than the hitherto odd specimens of rich stone exhibited, will come to the surface. The country is considered by exports more likely-looking than Eidsvold, that being of a granite formation ; but here the gold is found in the genuine gold-bearing quartz, the same as at Gympie and Croydon. Of course, everything is as yet in. its infancy, but the prospects are very encouraging. Alongside of Messrs. Joyce's prospecting claim Messrs. Hogg and Macansh have pegged out a block claim, four men's ground, 200ft. x 200ft., and are now following up the loaders, indications of fine gold being discernible right through. The nearest route from Chinchilla lies all along a good sandy and gravelly road fit to be travelled over after the heaviest rain.

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Queensland Figaro and Punch (Brisbane, Qld. : 1885 - 1889), Saturday 14 April 1888, page 5


The present Hawkwood rush promises to rival the Eidsvold. Hogg and Macansh have pegged out a block claim—four men's ground—next to Joyce's prospecting claim, and are on grand indications. Hogg of the Royal Hotel, Chinchilla, will be running coaches to the field on and after Monday next. Dalby is the handiest moderately big town to the new rush.

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Queensland Figaro and Punch (Brisbane, Qld. : 1885 - 1889), Saturday 5 May 1888, page 5


Francis Hogg, who runs the Royal Hotel, Chinchilla, has now a big establishment, the additions he has recently made to the old premises adding greatly to their pretentiousness. He also runs a store, a large receiving store, and owns butcher's and blacksmith's shops close to his hotel. In addition to this, Francis goes in for grape culture and maize growing, and intends shortly to run a coach between Chinchilla and Hawkwood, so that it will be easily understood that he is a Hogg for business. He is a rare man, is Francis, and if you drop across him at any time, you must get him to tell you all about his being the first white man to explore and open up the mouth of the river Murray, as well as the first man who built a ship in Australia.

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Monday 8 August 1887, page 6


ROYAL SOCIETY.

A NEW FOSSIL Mammal

" On an Extinct Mammal of a Genus Apparently New," by Mr C W DE VIS, M A

The subject of this paper was a huge and nearly perfect head, the total length of the cranium exceeding 20 in Viewing its upper profile were presented first the produced and deflected lntermaxillary bones in front of the orifice of the nose, then the nasals, narrow and obtuse, overhanging this, and then a gently descending slope from the tip of the nasals to the union between these and the frontal bones, and then upon these frontals an openly sweeping upward curve.

On either side the processes of the cheek bone, long and descending below the level of the upper molars, formed conspicious objects, as did also these large but slender cheek bones themselves. The lower mandible, now connected with the skull, was narrow but deep and sloped away at the symphysis, or chin, at an angle of 40deg. The brain case, apparently small in capacity , had been shattered and crushed in.

In the upper jaw, on each side, were two incisor teeth, one premolar and four molars and in the lower jaw each lateral portion presented the same number of molars and premolars but only one incisor. It was the anterior of the two pair of incisor teeth in the upper and the corresponding part in the lower jaw around which so much interest centred. These were in the form of rapidly tapering tusks, the upper ones measuring 2.2 in. , and the lower ones 2.3 in. in length (measured at the inner foreangle), those above and below being similar in size, shape, and curvature The interval between the tips of these curious incisors was the name in upper and lower jaw. These tusk like teeth also presented on the inner -- the same side of the opposite pairs, large surfaces of wear. The second pair of incisors, present in the upper jaw only, were quite rudimentary, with columnar crowns sloping and curving forward from their outlet.

The grinding teeth in each jaw more or less resembled those of the other animals of the family Diprotodontina. They were all very much worn on their upper surfaces, and the two front grinders on the lower jaw were also worn on the inner sides of the crowns Between the incisors and molars in the lower jaw also was a rough protuberant body. The existence of this tuberosity and the position also of the surfaces of wear on the different teeth, as well as other considerations, had suggested to the author that the animal to which the fossil skull belonged was endowed with a powerful tongue and muscular expansile lips, and that it masticated and yet laboriously ground its food--the leafy twigs from the branches of saplings, which the large tusks enabled the animal to grapple and hold down.

The group to which the newly-discovered animal, represented by the skull exhibited, belonged was that named Diprotodontina, which comprised animals huge in bulk and heavy of limb, ranging downward in size from Diprotodon, which attained nearly the dimensions of an elephant, to Sthenomerus, which might have been only as large as a small bullock. Mr De Garis proposed to designate this annual Owenia grata, assigning to it as a generic title a name suggested by that of the veteran expositor of the extinct mammals of Australia, Sir Richard Owen.

Concerning its position in the family to we back it belonged, the author remarked "The affinity of Owerna to the gravidade diprotodonts, known by their cranial remains, is plainly expressed by the structure of its grinding teeth. Had those alone been left to us it would have been difficult to avoid the error of referring them to a small species of Nototherium. The incisors on the other hand are so strongly differentiated, not only from those of Diprotodon, Nototherium, and Stenomerus, but from those of the phytophagous marsupials generally, that had those been our sole guides we might have been led to speculate on the existence of a carnivor more destructive than Thylacoleo. But its general relationship being evident, it is only necessary to ascertain to which of the older and better known genera it has the nearest alliance.

The absence of the dilated muzzle, flat face, elevated forehead, huge zygomata and strongly inflected mandibular angle of Nototherium shows that in its leading characters its affinity to that genus was anything but close.

From Diprotodon it was not so far removed in the several features in which it departs from Nototherium, or rather departs less from its more ponderous contemporary. IN the not in by the conformation of the posterior moiety of the mandible, that of the condyle excepted, it indeed resembles Diprotodon rather closely, The chief difference being in the greater development of the altar expansion in the newer genus. "

The museum collection contained bones of the skeleton, other than crania, which could not yet be associated with any characterised genus of fossil mammals, but one was not at present justified in referring any of these also to this new genus Owenia.

Mr De Vis informed the meeting that the subject of the present notice was discovered by Mr Kendal Broadbent, at Chinchilla on the Darling Downs, and it must have come to rest in the place where found but a few months after death., since not only was the lower jaw still in its natural position, but portions of the first two vertebrae also. The braincase and fragile portions of the lower jaw had, however, become crushed.

(nb also a photo as a pdf)

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Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Tuesday 6 September 1887, page 4


Lost in the Bush.

The Commissioner for Police has received the following telegram, dated Miles, September 5 : 'Man named George, surname unknown, timber-getter, reported lost in bush Coolumbulla siding,^Saturday last ; was tracked on to road going direction of Chinchilla ; will probably turn up there ; police advised.'

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Wednesday 7 September 1887, page 7


PARLIAMENT.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER G.

LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.

It was proposed to alter the Maranoa by including the Taroom district, thus giving it an increase of population, which had diminished somewhat since the railway camps had been removed. To the Taroom district would be added a portion of the Northern Downs and Condamine. Of the remainder of the Northern Downs, which at present was extremely small, having a total population of 2573, and an adult population of 907, they proposed to add a portion to the electorate of Dalby', which it abutted to the south. The total population of Dalby was 2449 and the adult population 543 only.

It was proposed to deal with the two constituenties by taking a part of Northern Downs into Taroom, and the Eastern part of Dalby, which was nearer Toowoomba, would be added to Aubigni, and a part of Dalby would be also added to Northern Downs.

It was proposed to call the remaining part of the new electorate Chinchilla ; the total population would be 4294, and the adult population 1233. It was a stationary population.

Mr. JESSOP» : Why call it Chinchilla ?

Sir S. W. Griffith : Because it is the native name associated with that part of the district.

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Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser (Qld. : 1875 - 1902), Thursday 8 September 1887, page 2


wo publish from the Bill descriptions of the local electoral districts of Aubigny, Cambooya, Drayton and Too-woomba, and Stanley, so that our readers may avail themselves of all possible information regarding the proposed changes, to be effected by the Redistribution Bill. The The Premier in another masterly speech introduced this Bill to Parliament on Tuesday. Want of space in this issue precludes anything more than a general description of the measure, and a running comment on the basis on which it was formed by Sir Samuel Griffith, As its name implies the Bill is to make provision for additional and better the presentation if the people in Queensland ir Parliament. The Bill when it becomes an Act is to repeal the Electoral Districts Act of 1878, and the Additional Members Act of 1885.

It provides that the Legislative Assembly of Queensland shall consist of sixty-eight members representing 57 constituencies. That gives an increase of nine members over the existing number, who will find seats by the division of old and creation of new electorates. Four of the nine now members will represent the North, the south will receive six, and the control division will lose one. Taking our own district first we find the new Bill provides for a Darling Downs group of eight members instead of nine as at present. Drayton and Toowoomba retains its present Parliamentary representative Strength. but the boundaries of the electorate are considerably extended in the direction pointed out in Tuesday's issue of this journal. The old Darling Downs, Northern Downs, and Dalby electorates disappear altogether, and they will in the future be known as, Cambooya, Cunningham, and Chinchilla each with one member. Chinchilla takes the place of Dalby and Northern Downs, and Cambooya and Cunningham replace Darling Downs.

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Darling Downs Gazette (Qld. : 1881 - 1922), Wednesday 14 September 1887, page 2


Our correspondent telegraphs that at a special meeting of the Dalby Municipal Council hold yesterday, a sub-committee was appointed to draw up resolutions for presentation to a public meeting to be held next Monday evening, to protest against the amalgamation of the electorate of Dalby with Northern Downs, and also against the adoption of the name of Chinchilla for the new electorate, as proposed in the Redistribution Bill now before the Legislative Assembly.

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Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1908), Tuesday 20 September 1887, page 5


DALBY. Monday, September 19. A public meeting was held in the School of Arts, this evening, to protest against the portion of the redistributing scheme which amalgamates Dalby with Northern Downs and calling it Chinchilla. About 150 persons were present, and the attendance would no doubt have been much larger but for the heavy thunderstorm which passed over the town at a late hour in the afternoon.

The following resolution was carried unanimously :-" That this meeting most strenuously protests against the gross injustice inficted upon the Dalby and Northern Downs electorate in the proposed action of the Government to amalgamate the electorates of Dalby and Northern Downs, and reducing their representatives to one member, and consider it unfair that Dalby, one of the oldest incorporated towns in the colony, and Northern Downs, one of the oldest electorates, should cease to be a separate constituency and become one to be called Chinchilla "

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Wednesday 5 October 1887, page 6


SUMMARY FOR. INTRODUCTION. POLITICAL.

There was an almost unanimous agreement that the bill should pass, but with amendments, and already in committee the Darling Downs members have secured the retention of Dalby,

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Friday 7 October 1887, page 6


PARLIAMENT.

LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.

Sir S. W. Griffiths said he was going to propose to strike out the line Chinchilla one member, as he could now see his way to a division of the electorates, which would leave the Darling Downs, including Dalby, almost the same as it appeared on the map. The difference would be that a total population of about 500 or 250 male adults would be taken out of the Darling Downs and put into the Western group, for the new district which had been conceded. By that means they would have the Dalby electorate comprising a total population of 3701. and an adult male population of 965.

Westward of that would be an electorate, which he proposed to call Murilla, which was the name of the divisional board in the centre of the district, and to strike out Chinchilla altogether, as that township was not, under the new arrangement, included within the boundaries. That would give a district of 2818 total population, and 1048 adult males. A change would thus be necessary in the Bulloo, Warrego, and Balonne. The total population of Balonne would be 2856 and adult males 1261, of the Warrego 2400 and 1300, and of Bulloo 1500 and 1000. That was, he believed, a fair division of this part of the colony. It would leave the Darling Downs in its present state, as far as population was concerned. The new boundaries would be circulated as soon as they were ready.

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Western Star and Roma Advertiser (Qld. : 1875 - 1948), Wednesday 28 December 1887, page 2


Mail Contracts.

The following tenders for the carriage of Post Office mails are amongst those Approved by his Excellency the Governor

Gayndah and Chinchilla, via Coonambula, Dykehead, Hawkwood, Auburn, and Burncluith; once a week, horse; two years, £160 per annnm ; T, Riardon, Chinchilla.

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Wednesday 1 February 1888, page 7


COUNTRY MAILS.

SOUTHERN AND WESTERN.

(From Local Papers to 28th January.)

in reference to the break in the telegraph lines below Chinchilla by the storm on the 26th instant, and which was recorded in Saturday's issue, a correspondent down the line sends the following to the Dalby Herald. -As the up mail tram was passing the 197-mile peg, it was struck by a severe storm of thunder, rain, and wind which was travelling from south to north. The force of the wind was so great that it carried large heavy branches of ironbark trees fully forty or fifty yards, hurlling them against the telegraph wires and completely wrecking the lines. The Brisbane and Tambo and the Brisbane and Thargomindah lines were broken in several places, and the railway wire was blown in contact with the train as it was travelling along, and consequently got considerably mangled. The line repairer from Miles left there on his tricycle and reached the locality of the disaster at an early hour that morning. He at once with the assistance of the railway gang got to work, and circuit was restored on all the lines by 11 a m lines. This was very good work considering the distance namely, thirty-four miles, from Miles, night travelling, and the sad havoc made to the wires by getting entangled with the train. One passenger, a Mr Davidson, of Womblebank, said that for a few seconds the sight was terrific, the passengers could see insulators flying over and about the train, and thought it a case of complete smash.

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Friday 10 February 1888, page 4


If any doubt was entertained of the suitability of the Queensland climate to the growth of the vine, it must be for-ever set at rest by the splendid display of grapes, the production of Queensland vine-yards, which has lately been made in some of the shop windows of this city. It is, however, unfortunate that local wine-makers have not been so successful as those of the Southern colonies, A very considerable proportion of the Queensland wines is too poor to be favourably spoken of, much of it is fortified to an extent that cannot be justified, and only a very small quantity of the annual vintage is really good. The wine-making that has yet been done in Queensland is experimental rather than practical. Anyone who has a know-ledge of agriculture knows enough to enable him to plant a plot of vines, and even if they are not carefully tended, Dame Nature usually takes care that they shall produce a fair yield of fruit. But few of the men who have given more or less attention to this profitable industry understand how to make good wine, and this is an art that can only be learnt as other things are learnt that require skill. Hence it is that few good sound wines are produced in this colony.

We have it from a gentleman who has all his life been connected with vine-growing and wine-making, and who visited a number of our principal vineyards a few years ago, that only in one instance of all those he saw had he reason to believe that the making and treatment of wine was thoroughly understood. It would not be fair to name the vineyards visited, but we may add that the wines from that one, the management of which he approved, have since risen very highly in public estimation by reason of their good quality.

We have a special reason just now for directing particular attention to this subject. From Roma there have been sent to Brisbane year after year, and this year par-ticularly, as fine table grapes as have ever been displayed in our shop windows. Where table grapes grow to such perfection, wine grapes will grow also ; and if the soil and climate of Roma suits them so well, there must be a large tract of country along the Western Railway that is equally favourable to their growth. That it would be an immense advantage to the colony to have extensive vineyards established either at Roma or in any other locality vineyards capable of supplying the demand for fruit and for wine is self evident. Any district in which an industry like this could be established would be largely benefited ; the men who were connected with it would amass fortunes if they knew how to successfully manage it, and the people of the colony would be supplied with a whole-some beverage at a moderate cost. These are considerations which need not be dilated upon ; but two things are essential if this happy condition is to be achieved. Men who have experience must be induced to take the matter in hand, and they must have capital enough to give the business a fair trial-or rather a fair start, for with capital and skill to help it on, we have no doubt of the speedy accomplishment of this most desirable object.

Just now there is some ground for hoping that an effort will be made to establish the business of viticulture at Mitchell, not as au experiment, but with a distinctly practical intention, and with, every confidence in its complete success on the part of the gentleman who wishes to undertake it. The gentleman we refer to is Mr. Henri Alexis Tardent, who has lately come to this colony with the intention of devoting himself to viticulture. Mr. Tardent is a Swiss by birth, is a married man in the prime of life, and is accompanied by his wife and four children. His account of himself is to the effect that he received his school education in the primary school where he spent his early years, and as his father was not a rich man he took part in the work common to that part of the country, and became practically acquainted with the wine-producing business, which is extensively carried on in the Canton de Vaud.

Being prompted by his ambition to acquire greater knowledge than he had gained at the primary school, he went to Austria and obtained a situation as tutor in a private family, and while there he gained a knowledge of the language of the country. Then he went to Russia and obtained a similar situation, and after a time migrated to Southern Russia, where he found relatives who were descended from his grand uncle, Professor Louis Tardent, who had successfully established viticulture in Bessarabia at the instance of Czar Alexander the First, and founded colonies of Swiss vinedressers in what had previously been an arid desert. There he married, but he also improved his previous acquaintance with vine culture and wine making, and had practical opportunities to learn the work connected with cellars, &c. During this time he had not neglected his education in other respects, and obtained some distinction at the Odessa University examinations. But health and other considerations compelled him to leave that part of the world, and he eventually decided to come to Queensland. He has brought with him good recommendations from the Swiss authorities who interested themselves in the work he had in contemplation.

Although he has had less than a year to make himself acquainted with our language Mr. Tardent has already gained sufficient knowledge of it to be able to express him-self very readily in conversation and in writing, and as soon as he came here he began the inquiries that were necessary to enable him to start in business as a vine-grower. He first satisfied himself that the vine could be grown with every prospect of success in Southern Queensland generally. Then, through the instrumentality of the Minister for Lands, he visited Roma and Mitchell.

He speaks highly of the capabilities of the country for wine-growing, from Chinchilla westward, but the country suited for this purpose is patchy until Roma is passed. At Chinchilla, Dulacca, Channing, and on Bungeworgorai Creek, near Roma, he says, in his report to Mr. Jordan, which we publish in another column, "There are many patches of excellent sandy loam which is able to satisfy the most exacting vine-grower." But he prefers that near Mitchell,

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Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Monday 17 December 1888, page 5


Died by the Wayside.

Tho Chinchilla police inform the commissioner that a man was found dead on Jandowi road| on Sunday. His name was Franz Christian Bow, and he wats a native of Prussia. It is believed he died from natural causes.

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Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1929), Saturday 15 December 1888, page 5


.

— ♦ — CABLE MESSAGES.

RESIGNATION OF THE SPANISH MINISTER. London, December 10. Owing to a difference with several of his colleagues, Senor Sagaata, the Spanish Premier, has resigned. The Queen has requested him to reorganise the Cabinet.

London, December IL Signor Sagasta, the late Premier, has succeeded in reforming the Spanish Cabinet. He takes the portfolios of Army and Foreign Ministry; Signor Chinchilla that of War, and Signor Becerra that for the Colonies.








Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Saturday 26 March 1887, page 509


Official Notifications.

(From last Saturday's Government Gazette.)

APPOINTMENTS.—

Members of committees for State schools are appointed as follow:—Chinchilla: G. Conroy, P. Henry, F. Hogg, D. Merritt, and J. Skehan :

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Darling Downs Gazette (Qld. : 1881 - 1922), Monday 27 February 1888, page 3


Queensland News.

At the Land Court sitting held at Dalby, before Mr. Commissioner Warner, on the 24th day of February, 1888, tho folloowing applications woro disposed of:—

Certificates granted subjoct to bailiff's report, J. Turner, junr., 159a., Chinchilla; E. Downs, 80a., Chinfchillaj

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Queensland Figaro and Punch (Brisbane, Qld. : 1885 - 1889), Saturday 1 September 1888, page 2


Clarke — Finch.—James Clarke, of Riversdale, Chinchilla, and Miss Harriet Finch, daughter of, James Finch, of the Albert River, South Queensland, were married at Dalby, on the 21st August, by the Rev. S. I. Alden, the ceremony being performed at the residence of J. Y. Black. Honeymoon at Toowoomba. The bridegroom is more familiarly known as "Jimmy Clarke," and his mother is affectionately styled " dear old Granny Clarke.*' The latter will long be remembered as the hospitable Rochdale hostess who always had a hearty welcome for travellers along the Dawson road.

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Chinchilla 1887 and 88 GOLD!!!, fossils; electorate of Chinchilla; grapes

Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Tuesday 13 March 1888, page 6


COUNTRY MAILS.

The Dalby Herald has been informed by a gentleman from Chinchilla that splendid specimens of gold have been discovered near Hawk-wood. He stated that a Mr. Sparks, a member of a prospecting party of eight, had brought into Chinchilla some fine specimens of stone showing splendid gold, obtained near Hawk-wood." He also stated that a prospecting claim in the locality of Hawkwood (about 110 miles from Dalby) had been sold for £150. It has also been rumoured that gold has been discovered near Rawbelle station. He said he had seen and read correspondence of a most reliable nature that had been bout in by the prospectors. The Herald adds:-" While we are on the " golden subject" we may state that of our own knowledge we are aware that application has been made for several mineral' rights to prospect in a locality about seventy miles from Dalby, and we have also heard that a good sample of tin has been brought in from a short distance from Dalby."

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Queensland Figaro and Punch (Brisbane, Qld. : 1885 - 1889), Saturday 7 April 1888, page 2


To Correspondents.

F, Hogg (Chinchilla) sends two samples—one for assay and one for testing. The sample No. 1 (for assay) consisted of quartz, and one ton of it contains 5dwt of gold. The sample No. 2 (for testing) contained copper, and proved itself far more auriferous than No. 1.

K. THEODORE STAIGER.

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Tuesday 10 April 1888, page 6


COUNTRY MAILS.

SOUTHERN AND WESTERN DISTBIOTS.

A correspondent writing to the Dalby Herald, says:-The rush to the Hawkwood locality has now set in in earnest. A sudden demand for miners' rights has sprung up at the Dalby Court House, which unfortunately could not be supplied, Dalby not as yet having been proclaimed a mining district, the applicants being directed either to Eidsvold or Toowoomba. Several parties, well equipped and backed up by some tradesmen, have also started during the week for Hawkwood, and ere long something more tangible than the hitherto odd specimens of rich stone exhibited, will come to the surface. The country is considered by exports more likely-looking than Eidsvold, that being of a granite formation ; but here the gold is found in the genuine gold-bearing quartz, the same as at Gympie and Croydon. Of course, everything is as yet in. its infancy, but the prospects are very encouraging. Alongside of Messrs. Joyce's prospecting claim Messrs. Hogg and Macansh have pegged out a block claim, four men's ground, 200ft. x 200ft., and are now following up the loaders, indications of fine gold being discernible right through. The nearest route from Chinchilla lies all along a good sandy and gravelly road fit to be travelled over after the heaviest rain.

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Queensland Figaro and Punch (Brisbane, Qld. : 1885 - 1889), Saturday 14 April 1888, page 5


The present Hawkwood rush promises to rival the Eidsvold. Hogg and Macansh have pegged out a block claim—four men's ground—next to Joyce's prospecting claim, and are on grand indications. Hogg of the Royal Hotel, Chinchilla, will be running coaches to the field on and after Monday next. Dalby is the handiest moderately big town to the new rush.

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Queensland Figaro and Punch (Brisbane, Qld. : 1885 - 1889), Saturday 5 May 1888, page 5


Francis Hogg, who runs the Royal Hotel, Chinchilla, has now a big establishment, the additions he has recently made to the old premises adding greatly to their pretentiousness. He also runs a store, a large receiving store, and owns butcher's and blacksmith's shops close to his hotel. In addition to this, Francis goes in for grape culture and maize growing, and intends shortly to run a coach between Chinchilla and Hawkwood, so that it will be easily understood that he is a Hogg for business. He is a rare man, is Francis, and if you drop across him at any time, you must get him to tell you all about his being the first white man to explore and open up the mouth of the river Murray, as well as the first man who built a ship in Australia.

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Monday 8 August 1887, page 6


ROYAL SOCIETY.

A NEW FOSSIL Mammal

" On an Extinct Mammal of a Genus Apparently New," by Mr C W DE VIS, M A

The subject of this paper was a huge and nearly perfect head, the total length of the cranium exceeding 20 in Viewing its upper profile were presented first the produced and deflected lntermaxillary bones in front of the orifice of the nose, then the nasals, narrow and obtuse, overhanging this, and then a gently descending slope from the tip of the nasals to the union between these and the frontal bones, and then upon these frontals an openly sweeping upward curve.

On either side the processes of the cheek bone, long and descending below the level of the upper molars, formed conspicious objects, as did also these large but slender cheek bones themselves. The lower mandible, now connected with the skull, was narrow but deep and sloped away at the symphysis, or chin, at an angle of 40deg. The brain case, apparently small in capacity , had been shattered and crushed in.

In the upper jaw, on each side, were two incisor teeth, one premolar and four molars and in the lower jaw each lateral portion presented the same number of molars and premolars but only one incisor. It was the anterior of the two pair of incisor teeth in the upper and the corresponding part in the lower jaw around which so much interest centred. These were in the form of rapidly tapering tusks, the upper ones measuring 2.2 in. , and the lower ones 2.3 in. in length (measured at the inner foreangle), those above and below being similar in size, shape, and curvature The interval between the tips of these curious incisors was the name in upper and lower jaw. These tusk like teeth also presented on the inner -- the same side of the opposite pairs, large surfaces of wear. The second pair of incisors, present in the upper jaw only, were quite rudimentary, with columnar crowns sloping and curving forward from their outlet.

The grinding teeth in each jaw more or less resembled those of the other animals of the family Diprotodontina. They were all very much worn on their upper surfaces, and the two front grinders on the lower jaw were also worn on the inner sides of the crowns Between the incisors and molars in the lower jaw also was a rough protuberant body. The existence of this tuberosity and the position also of the surfaces of wear on the different teeth, as well as other considerations, had suggested to the author that the animal to which the fossil skull belonged was endowed with a powerful tongue and muscular expansile lips, and that it masticated and yet laboriously ground its food--the leafy twigs from the branches of saplings, which the large tusks enabled the animal to grapple and hold down.

The group to which the newly-discovered animal, represented by the skull exhibited, belonged was that named Diprotodontina, which comprised animals huge in bulk and heavy of limb, ranging downward in size from Diprotodon, which attained nearly the dimensions of an elephant, to Sthenomerus, which might have been only as large as a small bullock. Mr De Garis proposed to designate this annual Owenia grata, assigning to it as a generic title a name suggested by that of the veteran expositor of the extinct mammals of Australia, Sir Richard Owen.

Concerning its position in the family to we back it belonged, the author remarked "The affinity of Owerna to the gravidade diprotodonts, known by their cranial remains, is plainly expressed by the structure of its grinding teeth. Had those alone been left to us it would have been difficult to avoid the error of referring them to a small species of Nototherium. The incisors on the other hand are so strongly differentiated, not only from those of Diprotodon, Nototherium, and Stenomerus, but from those of the phytophagous marsupials generally, that had those been our sole guides we might have been led to speculate on the existence of a carnivor more destructive than Thylacoleo. But its general relationship being evident, it is only necessary to ascertain to which of the older and better known genera it has the nearest alliance.

The absence of the dilated muzzle, flat face, elevated forehead, huge zygomata and strongly inflected mandibular angle of Nototherium shows that in its leading characters its affinity to that genus was anything but close.

From Diprotodon it was not so far removed in the several features in which it departs from Nototherium, or rather departs less from its more ponderous contemporary. IN the not in by the conformation of the posterior moiety of the mandible, that of the condyle excepted, it indeed resembles Diprotodon rather closely, The chief difference being in the greater development of the altar expansion in the newer genus. "

The museum collection contained bones of the skeleton, other than crania, which could not yet be associated with any characterised genus of fossil mammals, but one was not at present justified in referring any of these also to this new genus Owenia.

Mr De Vis informed the meeting that the subject of the present notice was discovered by Mr Kendal Broadbent, at Chinchilla on the Darling Downs, and it must have come to rest in the place where found but a few months after death., since not only was the lower jaw still in its natural position, but portions of the first two vertebrae also. The braincase and fragile portions of the lower jaw had, however, become crushed.

(nb also a photo as a pdf)

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Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Tuesday 6 September 1887, page 4


Lost in the Bush.

The Commissioner for Police has received the following telegram, dated Miles, September 5 : 'Man named George, surname unknown, timber-getter, reported lost in bush Coolumbulla siding,^Saturday last ; was tracked on to road going direction of Chinchilla ; will probably turn up there ; police advised.'

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Wednesday 7 September 1887, page 7


PARLIAMENT.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER G.

LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.

It was proposed to alter the Maranoa by including the Taroom district, thus giving it an increase of population, which had diminished somewhat since the railway camps had been removed. To the Taroom district would be added a portion of the Northern Downs and Condamine. Of the remainder of the Northern Downs, which at present was extremely small, having a total population of 2573, and an adult population of 907, they proposed to add a portion to the electorate of Dalby', which it abutted to the south. The total population of Dalby was 2449 and the adult population 543 only.

It was proposed to deal with the two constituenties by taking a part of Northern Downs into Taroom, and the Eastern part of Dalby, which was nearer Toowoomba, would be added to Aubigni, and a part of Dalby would be also added to Northern Downs.

It was proposed to call the remaining part of the new electorate Chinchilla ; the total population would be 4294, and the adult population 1233. It was a stationary population.

Mr. JESSOP» : Why call it Chinchilla ?

Sir S. W. Griffith : Because it is the native name associated with that part of the district.

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Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser (Qld. : 1875 - 1902), Thursday 8 September 1887, page 2


wo publish from the Bill descriptions of the local electoral districts of Aubigny, Cambooya, Drayton and Too-woomba, and Stanley, so that our readers may avail themselves of all possible information regarding the proposed changes, to be effected by the Redistribution Bill. The The Premier in another masterly speech introduced this Bill to Parliament on Tuesday. Want of space in this issue precludes anything more than a general description of the measure, and a running comment on the basis on which it was formed by Sir Samuel Griffith, As its name implies the Bill is to make provision for additional and better the presentation if the people in Queensland ir Parliament. The Bill when it becomes an Act is to repeal the Electoral Districts Act of 1878, and the Additional Members Act of 1885.

It provides that the Legislative Assembly of Queensland shall consist of sixty-eight members representing 57 constituencies. That gives an increase of nine members over the existing number, who will find seats by the division of old and creation of new electorates. Four of the nine now members will represent the North, the south will receive six, and the control division will lose one. Taking our own district first we find the new Bill provides for a Darling Downs group of eight members instead of nine as at present. Drayton and Toowoomba retains its present Parliamentary representative Strength. but the boundaries of the electorate are considerably extended in the direction pointed out in Tuesday's issue of this journal. The old Darling Downs, Northern Downs, and Dalby electorates disappear altogether, and they will in the future be known as, Cambooya, Cunningham, and Chinchilla each with one member. Chinchilla takes the place of Dalby and Northern Downs, and Cambooya and Cunningham replace Darling Downs.

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Darling Downs Gazette (Qld. : 1881 - 1922), Wednesday 14 September 1887, page 2


Our correspondent telegraphs that at a special meeting of the Dalby Municipal Council hold yesterday, a sub-committee was appointed to draw up resolutions for presentation to a public meeting to be held next Monday evening, to protest against the amalgamation of the electorate of Dalby with Northern Downs, and also against the adoption of the name of Chinchilla for the new electorate, as proposed in the Redistribution Bill now before the Legislative Assembly.

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Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1908), Tuesday 20 September 1887, page 5


DALBY. Monday, September 19. A public meeting was held in the School of Arts, this evening, to protest against the portion of the redistributing scheme which amalgamates Dalby with Northern Downs and calling it Chinchilla. About 150 persons were present, and the attendance would no doubt have been much larger but for the heavy thunderstorm which passed over the town at a late hour in the afternoon.

The following resolution was carried unanimously :-" That this meeting most strenuously protests against the gross injustice inficted upon the Dalby and Northern Downs electorate in the proposed action of the Government to amalgamate the electorates of Dalby and Northern Downs, and reducing their representatives to one member, and consider it unfair that Dalby, one of the oldest incorporated towns in the colony, and Northern Downs, one of the oldest electorates, should cease to be a separate constituency and become one to be called Chinchilla "

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Wednesday 5 October 1887, page 6


SUMMARY FOR. INTRODUCTION. POLITICAL.

There was an almost unanimous agreement that the bill should pass, but with amendments, and already in committee the Darling Downs members have secured the retention of Dalby,

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Friday 7 October 1887, page 6


PARLIAMENT.

LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.

Sir S. W. Griffiths said he was going to propose to strike out the line Chinchilla one member, as he could now see his way to a division of the electorates, which would leave the Darling Downs, including Dalby, almost the same as it appeared on the map. The difference would be that a total population of about 500 or 250 male adults would be taken out of the Darling Downs and put into the Western group, for the new district which had been conceded. By that means they would have the Dalby electorate comprising a total population of 3701. and an adult male population of 965.

Westward of that would be an electorate, which he proposed to call Murilla, which was the name of the divisional board in the centre of the district, and to strike out Chinchilla altogether, as that township was not, under the new arrangement, included within the boundaries. That would give a district of 2818 total population, and 1048 adult males. A change would thus be necessary in the Bulloo, Warrego, and Balonne. The total population of Balonne would be 2856 and adult males 1261, of the Warrego 2400 and 1300, and of Bulloo 1500 and 1000. That was, he believed, a fair division of this part of the colony. It would leave the Darling Downs in its present state, as far as population was concerned. The new boundaries would be circulated as soon as they were ready.

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Western Star and Roma Advertiser (Qld. : 1875 - 1948), Wednesday 28 December 1887, page 2


Mail Contracts.

The following tenders for the carriage of Post Office mails are amongst those Approved by his Excellency the Governor

Gayndah and Chinchilla, via Coonambula, Dykehead, Hawkwood, Auburn, and Burncluith; once a week, horse; two years, £160 per annnm ; T, Riardon, Chinchilla.

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Wednesday 1 February 1888, page 7


COUNTRY MAILS.

SOUTHERN AND WESTERN.

(From Local Papers to 28th January.)

in reference to the break in the telegraph lines below Chinchilla by the storm on the 26th instant, and which was recorded in Saturday's issue, a correspondent down the line sends the following to the Dalby Herald. -As the up mail tram was passing the 197-mile peg, it was struck by a severe storm of thunder, rain, and wind which was travelling from south to north. The force of the wind was so great that it carried large heavy branches of ironbark trees fully forty or fifty yards, hurlling them against the telegraph wires and completely wrecking the lines. The Brisbane and Tambo and the Brisbane and Thargomindah lines were broken in several places, and the railway wire was blown in contact with the train as it was travelling along, and consequently got considerably mangled. The line repairer from Miles left there on his tricycle and reached the locality of the disaster at an early hour that morning. He at once with the assistance of the railway gang got to work, and circuit was restored on all the lines by 11 a m lines. This was very good work considering the distance namely, thirty-four miles, from Miles, night travelling, and the sad havoc made to the wires by getting entangled with the train. One passenger, a Mr Davidson, of Womblebank, said that for a few seconds the sight was terrific, the passengers could see insulators flying over and about the train, and thought it a case of complete smash.

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Friday 10 February 1888, page 4


If any doubt was entertained of the suitability of the Queensland climate to the growth of the vine, it must be for-ever set at rest by the splendid display of grapes, the production of Queensland vine-yards, which has lately been made in some of the shop windows of this city. It is, however, unfortunate that local wine-makers have not been so successful as those of the Southern colonies, A very considerable proportion of the Queensland wines is too poor to be favourably spoken of, much of it is fortified to an extent that cannot be justified, and only a very small quantity of the annual vintage is really good. The wine-making that has yet been done in Queensland is experimental rather than practical. Anyone who has a know-ledge of agriculture knows enough to enable him to plant a plot of vines, and even if they are not carefully tended, Dame Nature usually takes care that they shall produce a fair yield of fruit. But few of the men who have given more or less attention to this profitable industry understand how to make good wine, and this is an art that can only be learnt as other things are learnt that require skill. Hence it is that few good sound wines are produced in this colony.

We have it from a gentleman who has all his life been connected with vine-growing and wine-making, and who visited a number of our principal vineyards a few years ago, that only in one instance of all those he saw had he reason to believe that the making and treatment of wine was thoroughly understood. It would not be fair to name the vineyards visited, but we may add that the wines from that one, the management of which he approved, have since risen very highly in public estimation by reason of their good quality.

We have a special reason just now for directing particular attention to this subject. From Roma there have been sent to Brisbane year after year, and this year par-ticularly, as fine table grapes as have ever been displayed in our shop windows. Where table grapes grow to such perfection, wine grapes will grow also ; and if the soil and climate of Roma suits them so well, there must be a large tract of country along the Western Railway that is equally favourable to their growth. That it would be an immense advantage to the colony to have extensive vineyards established either at Roma or in any other locality vineyards capable of supplying the demand for fruit and for wine is self evident. Any district in which an industry like this could be established would be largely benefited ; the men who were connected with it would amass fortunes if they knew how to successfully manage it, and the people of the colony would be supplied with a whole-some beverage at a moderate cost. These are considerations which need not be dilated upon ; but two things are essential if this happy condition is to be achieved. Men who have experience must be induced to take the matter in hand, and they must have capital enough to give the business a fair trial-or rather a fair start, for with capital and skill to help it on, we have no doubt of the speedy accomplishment of this most desirable object.

Just now there is some ground for hoping that an effort will be made to establish the business of viticulture at Mitchell, not as au experiment, but with a distinctly practical intention, and with, every confidence in its complete success on the part of the gentleman who wishes to undertake it. The gentleman we refer to is Mr. Henri Alexis Tardent, who has lately come to this colony with the intention of devoting himself to viticulture. Mr. Tardent is a Swiss by birth, is a married man in the prime of life, and is accompanied by his wife and four children. His account of himself is to the effect that he received his school education in the primary school where he spent his early years, and as his father was not a rich man he took part in the work common to that part of the country, and became practically acquainted with the wine-producing business, which is extensively carried on in the Canton de Vaud.

Being prompted by his ambition to acquire greater knowledge than he had gained at the primary school, he went to Austria and obtained a situation as tutor in a private family, and while there he gained a knowledge of the language of the country. Then he went to Russia and obtained a similar situation, and after a time migrated to Southern Russia, where he found relatives who were descended from his grand uncle, Professor Louis Tardent, who had successfully established viticulture in Bessarabia at the instance of Czar Alexander the First, and founded colonies of Swiss vinedressers in what had previously been an arid desert. There he married, but he also improved his previous acquaintance with vine culture and wine making, and had practical opportunities to learn the work connected with cellars, &c. During this time he had not neglected his education in other respects, and obtained some distinction at the Odessa University examinations. But health and other considerations compelled him to leave that part of the world, and he eventually decided to come to Queensland. He has brought with him good recommendations from the Swiss authorities who interested themselves in the work he had in contemplation.

Although he has had less than a year to make himself acquainted with our language Mr. Tardent has already gained sufficient knowledge of it to be able to express him-self very readily in conversation and in writing, and as soon as he came here he began the inquiries that were necessary to enable him to start in business as a vine-grower. He first satisfied himself that the vine could be grown with every prospect of success in Southern Queensland generally. Then, through the instrumentality of the Minister for Lands, he visited Roma and Mitchell.

He speaks highly of the capabilities of the country for wine-growing, from Chinchilla westward, but the country suited for this purpose is patchy until Roma is passed. At Chinchilla, Dulacca, Channing, and on Bungeworgorai Creek, near Roma, he says, in his report to Mr. Jordan, which we publish in another column, "There are many patches of excellent sandy loam which is able to satisfy the most exacting vine-grower." But he prefers that near Mitchell,

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Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Monday 17 December 1888, page 5


Died by the Wayside.

Tho Chinchilla police inform the commissioner that a man was found dead on Jandowi road| on Sunday. His name was Franz Christian Bow, and he wats a native of Prussia. It is believed he died from natural causes.

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Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1929), Saturday 15 December 1888, page 5


.

— ♦ — CABLE MESSAGES.

RESIGNATION OF THE SPANISH MINISTER. London, December 10. Owing to a difference with several of his colleagues, Senor Sagaata, the Spanish Premier, has resigned. The Queen has requested him to reorganise the Cabinet.

London, December IL Signor Sagasta, the late Premier, has succeeded in reforming the Spanish Cabinet. He takes the portfolios of Army and Foreign Ministry; Signor Chinchilla that of War, and Signor Becerra that for the Colonies.



Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Saturday 26 March 1887, page 509


Official Notifications.

(From last Saturday's Government Gazette.)

APPOINTMENTS.—

Members of committees for State schools are appointed as follow:—Chinchilla: G. Conroy, P. Henry, F. Hogg, D. Merritt, and J. Skehan :

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Darling Downs Gazette (Qld. : 1881 - 1922), Monday 27 February 1888, page 3


Queensland News.

At the Land Court sitting held at Dalby, before Mr. Commissioner Warner, on the 24th day of February, 1888, tho folloowing applications woro disposed of:—

Certificates granted subjoct to bailiff's report, J. Turner, junr., 159a., Chinchilla; E. Downs, 80a., Chinfchillaj

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Queensland Figaro and Punch (Brisbane, Qld. : 1885 - 1889), Saturday 1 September 1888, page 2


Clarke — Finch.—James Clarke, of Riversdale, Chinchilla, and Miss Harriet Finch, daughter of, James Finch, of the Albert River, South Queensland, were married at Dalby, on the 21st August, by the Rev. S. I. Alden, the ceremony being performed at the residence of J. Y. Black. Honeymoon at Toowoomba. The bridegroom is more familiarly known as "Jimmy Clarke," and his mother is affectionately styled " dear old Granny Clarke.*' The latter will long be remembered as the hospitable Rochdale hostess who always had a hearty welcome for travellers along the Dawson road.

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