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Chinchilla during 1901

Warwick Argus (Qld. : 1879 - 1901), Tuesday 22 January 1901, page 2


SERIOUS ACCIDENT - The Dalby Herald re-ports that an accident of a serious character befell Mr. B. J. Clune last week. He was driving home from Chinchilla, when the wheel of the sulky collided with a stump. Several spokes of the wheel were smashed, and Mr. Clune was thrown over the splash board. The horse was thrown on to his haunches, coming down on top of Mr. Clune, with the result that both his collar-bones were broken. Latest reports state that the sufferer is pro-gressing favorably. Mr. Clune, who is at present in charge of the receiving office at Durah, was formerly an officer in Telegraph Department at Warwick.

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Darling Downs Gazette (Qld. : 1881 - 1922), Saturday 2 February 1901, page 6


Wambo DiYisional Board

REGULAR MEETING.

. Before proceeding with the business of the meeting, at the instance of the Chan man and Mr Ensor a motion of sympathy with the nation 'in the death of her Most Gracious Majesty Queen Victoria was passed unanimously.

1 The following correspondence was read and dealt with — x From Thos Horswood, Chinchilla, applying for work on the day gang. Agreed applicant, be put on as soon as vacancy occurred, but that in future all appointments and dismisses should be made by the ganger

From John Singin, Chinchilla, stating that he had commenced the destruction of prickly pear on his property, but it would take him sometime to- complete the work.

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Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Tuesday 12 February 1901, page 2


Provincial Pickings.

Tho Dalby Record's correspondent at Chinchilla writes : Chinchilla is undoubtedly on the up grade. New dwelling-houses continue to make their appearance, and arrangements are being made for the erection of others ' in the immediate future. A saddlery business has been established in our midst within the past week or so, and altogether the township is beginning to assume a noticeable advancement in many respects.

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Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1908), Thursday 7 March 1901, page 2


DALBY, March 4.

What might have been a very serious accident happened on Saturday evening between Chinchilla and Wombo. Mr. Lynch, of Wombo, and Mr. Robert Mackie, of Fairy Meadow, were driving out from Chinchilla in a sulky, when the horse took fright and bolted through timbered country, running the sulky on to a stump. Mr. Lynch, who was driving, was pulled over the dashboard and dragged for some distance, the traces having been broken by the sudden impact. Mr. Mackie was thrown into the bottom of the sulky, but both escaped with a severe shaking and some bruises.

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Darling Downs Gazette (Qld. : 1881 - 1922), Saturday 9 March 1901, page 3


CORRESPONDENCE;

From. W. Fraser, Chinchilla; asking the Board to deny a statement made by some person that he (Mr Fraser) wrote a letter to the Board complaining that a man was employed on the day gang that was not a ratepayer. As the Board have never received such a communication from any person, Mr Fraser is exonerated from any suspicion or accusations.

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Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Saturday 13 April 1901, page 715


THE RANK AND FILE.

NOMINAL ROLL OF THE SIXTH QUEENSLAND CONTINGENT.

349. Mooney, James, care of F. Mooney, Chinchilla. (photo available on another page)

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Charleville Times (Brisbane, Qld. : 1896 - 1954), Saturday 4 May 1901, page 2


DEATH OF B. P. BRODIE.-The Dalby Record reports: Mr. B. P. Brodie, assistant stock inspector of this district, who has been ailing for some time, passed peacefully away at Chinchilla at 10*20 a.m. on 95th April. Much sympathy is felt for the wife and family of deceased. The late Mr. B. P. Brodie was a man who had passed a lifetime amongst stock and was full of knowledge on pastoral matters. He came of an old Hunter River, N.S.W , family, who are well-known in Queensland. Mr. T. A. Brodie, manager of Nive Downs, and Mr. W. Brodie, pastoral inspector for the Bank of New South Wales, are brothers of the deceased gentleman, and another brother owned a cattle station in the Normanton district, Mrs. George King, wife of the manager of the Peel Riber Company's station. Goonoo Goonoo, near Tamworth, (N.S.W.), and Mrs. George Munro, widow of the former manager of Boondooma station, on the Burnett, are sisters.

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Tuesday 14 May 1901, page 7


THE PRICKLY PEAR NUISANCE.

TO THE EDITOR.

Sir,-It seems strange to draw the attention of the people to the spread of prickly pear, but my excuse is, the way is spreading in some localities, and rendering Whole tracts of country worse than useless, for not only is the country being destroyed and rendered useless, but it is the nursery for the spread of this curse; where it has firmly established itself it would be perfectly futile to attempt to eradicate it.


I have seen hundreds of thousands of acres so dense that it could not be cleared for £10 an acre, and the land, if cleaned of pear, is not worth 5s. an acre, and it would cost millions to clear; but surely something may be done to confine it to the localities where it must remain, by having the out-skirts kept clear before more country is absolutely destroyed.

It is spread by flood, birds, and animals of all descriptions, and if not combated with in time, it seems as if the greater part of the colony will be rendered perfectly useless. Should anyone wish to verify my statements, let them visit Chinchilla, the watershed of the Condamine, or the Moonie, where they will be surprised to see so much country destroyed in a few years, for it has not been in existence more than twenty-five to thirty years.

Dry weather seems to suit it better than wet. Like all curses, it seems to thrive and flourish under all circumstances. I thought I had seen country badly infected with prickly pear, but never have realised what destruction it is causing, and likely to cause, if some way cannot be found to minimise the rapidity with which it is spreading. Of course, in private speculation, it means always, Can the work done compensate for the outlay ? In this case, I empathically -say It cannot, for I am certain it could not be cleared for £10 an acre, whilst the land is not worth ,5s.

I am, sir, etc., J. T. M. BELL.

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Gympie Times and Mary River Mining Gazette (Qld. : 1868 - 1919), Saturday 1 June 1901, page 9


The Government have' agreed to erect a State dip at Chinchilla, 50 miles beyond Dalby.

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Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Friday 9 August 1901, page 5


Reserves Proclaimed.

. for racecourse, about 180 acres at Chinchilla ;

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Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Saturday 17 August 1901, page 343


WEDDINGS.

Rayner—Bunt.

The marriage of Mr. George Rayner, fourth eldest son of Mrs. David Rayner, of Moraby station, to Miss Edith Bunt, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. Bunt, of Thistledean, Chinchilla, was celebrated by the Rev. Mr. Stewart, Wesleyan Minister, at his residence on the 6th instant. The bride looked charming in her wedding cress of cream voile, and veil arranged with orange blossoms. The bride carried a beautiful bunch of white flowers and ferns, presented by Mrs. J. Dangerfield. Miss Ethel Bunt acted as bridesmaid, and Mr. W. A. Rayner as best man. The presents were costly, and greatly admired.

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Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser (Qld. : 1875 - 1902), Thursday 12 September 1901, page 2


Chinchilla is to be congratulated on its enterprise. The proprietors of the new public hall recently erected there may well be proud of the good work they have done for the community. They have erected a large and commodious hall capable of seating four hundred persons. Tho hall is 70 feet long and 30 feet wide, with 13 feet wall. At one end is a spacious platform. It is painted on the outside walls. The building is made of Cyprus pine. Great credit is due to Messrs. R. A. Ward and H. Curtis for the splendid manner in which they executed their contract. The hall was used for the first time by Mr. L. E. Groom on the occasion of his recent visit there.

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Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Saturday 21 September 1901, page 581


LAND COMMISSIONERS' COURTS.

DALBY. Before Commissioner J. R. Warner. 6th September.

Applications for Land.

Agricultural farm: Accepted-Andrew M'Intyre, 160a., Earle.

Agricultural farms : Granted for lease—Thomas Bateman. 100a., Chinchilla.. Adjourned—Michael Callaghan, 776a., Chinchilla.

Grazing farm : Adjourned—George Ensor, 820 a.. Chinchilla;

Conditional selection : Granted for deed—Thomas Allen, 160 a.. Chinchilla.

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Tuesday 1 October 1901, page 6


THE PRICKLY PEAR PEST.

TO THE EDITOR.

Sir,—We have, in the despised unselected brigalow scrubs, within easy distance of second to none in Australia; the very rich-ness of the soil has been our bane, as the prickly pear will not nourish on poor land, so it naturally made a home in the rich brigalow scrubs. If a prickly pear is hung up, the moisture in the atmosphere will keep it alive; but lying on the ground, competing with other moisture-seeking substances, it will die if deprived of its roots.

I was pleased to notice some time ago, the member for Murilla spoke of introducing a bill to deal with this pest. I sent him the following suggestions:That certain areas be declared prickly pear infested, and thrown open to selection before survey, allowing the lessees whose runs are incorporated in the area the privilege of taking advantage of part IV. of the 1884 Land Act, granting a subsidy of £1 per acre for all prickly pear infested land that is cleared of the pest, and a deed of grant to the lessee of as many acres as in the opinion of a competent appraiser would come within the meaning of the word, prickly-pear infested. That is to say, if a selector took up 5000 acres in a pear-infested area, and the pear was scattered all over it, but in the opinion of the appraiser it would re-quire the whole of it to constitute 500 acres of prickly-pear infested land within the meaning of the Act, let the State, upon certificate of the land being cleared within a prescribed time, pay the selector in hard cash £500, and give him a grant of 500 acres of land on any part of his selection in one square block, conforming with some of the boundary lines.

When we come to recognise that the pear monopolises the richest of our lands, the alarming extent to which it is spreading, and the powerlessness of the pastoralist to cope with it, together with the absolute necessity of preserving all our pasture land within the influences of the coastal rain belt, in the interest of the meat and dairy industry, no reasonable sacrifice ought to be objected to.

To-day we count our loss by thousands of acres of the pride of our inheritance; before the next decade we shall count it by millions. A man with a cancer must be drastically treated, or he will die. The prickly pear is a cancer in the pastoral region, and if not drastically treated that will die too. The prickly pear is one of the unsolved problems of the future, and I would like to meet some one willing to discuss the subject from a practical point. I would suggest treating it with liquid fire. This is an ingredient which, when set afire, cannot be extinguished by any known means, is harmless while in a quiet state, but once aglow nothing will overcome the flame, the latter burning with an intense heat until the compound is completely destroyed by combustion. There is no explosion or rapid spreading of flames; it is a strange living fire, which can be poured out like water from an ordinary watering can, and so arranged as to ignite after passing through the strainer on its way to the plant.—I am, sir, &c.,

ROBERT MACKIE.

Fairy Meadow, Chinchilla, 16th September.

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Darling Downs Gazette (Qld. : 1881 - 1922), Tuesday 8 October 1901, page 3


WAMBO BOARD.

From F. S. Hogg, Chinchilla, asking for road to be closed on her property as shown on plan forwarded with letter. Closure of road recommended. From W. A. Price and James Martin, Chinchilla, re closure of road through their property. Agreed that Mr. Price's letter be sent to Mr. Martin

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Saturday 12 October 1901, page 2


Mackie—Moore

A very quiet wedding took place on Wednesday at St. John's Pro-Cathedral, between Mr. Robert Clift Mackie, of Fairy Meadow and Weambilla stations, Chinchilla, and Mrs. Bernard Moore, widow of the late Captain Bernard Moore, royal navy, the officiating clergyman being the Ven. Archdeacon Jones, of Indooroopilly.

The bride was given away by Mr. E. Day Bird, and accompanied by Mrs. C. V. Sellheim, Sir Hugh Nelson accompanying the bridegroom. After the ceremony breakfast was partaken of at the Gresham Hotel, the health of the bride and bridegroom being proposed by Sir Hugh. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mackie left for an extended tour through the Southern colonies, Tasmania, and New Zealand.

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Warwick Examiner and Times (Qld. : 1867 - 1919), Saturday 19 October 1901, page 7


Mr. Klein, representing 850 German families, is inspecting land at Chinchilla and Warra for a second batch of his immigrants. He then proceeds home to escort the first lot of 100 families out.

A large number of German families in South Australia are in a bad way and desire to settle in Queensland. The Government is offering facilities for them to do so.

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Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1860 - 1947), Saturday 19 October 1901, page 2


Mr. R. Mackie, of Fairy Meadows, Chinchilla, writes as follows to the "Courier": —I read in your issue of 10th, instant a debate on Mr. Bell's Prickly-pear Bill. I regret to say this bill will not meet the requirements of the case. Three hundred and twenty acre prickly-pear lots are not in demand, and the cost of clearing the pest by tender is quite out of the question under existing circumstances. I had an interview with Mr. Kates, M.L.A., yesterday, and he appears to have got the right hang of the subject. His idea of forming a buffer area around the densely-infested parts and selling it at a reasonable figure, coupled with the conditions that the purchaser, clear off the prickly-pear, and keep the land free of it, is likely to catch on if it is done at once. Land that is worth accepting as a gift to-day, in twelve months' time would be too much infested to occupy under any circumstances, with a prospect of making a fair living out of it, even if the payment extended over four years.

I have fought the prickly-pear since 1884, and I know my subject. Unless the terms are very favourable, and the area large enough to hold out a prospect of success, no one will risk it. But if it is dealt with at once upon the lines the above gentleman proposes, I have no fear of the result, and only regret the chance did not come my way when I was engaged in pastoral pursuits.

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Tuesday 29 October 1901, page 2


CHINCHILLA DD.

The construction of the new Government dip at Chinchilla has really been com-pleted, and the yards surrounding it and the pump with which water will be drawn from the creek are being erected. The dip is said to be a very good one.

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Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1908), Thursday 7 November 1901, page 8


Dalby, November 2. A very successful tea-meeting in aid of the fund for the erection of a Church of England at Chinchilla was held at that place on Wednesday last, and resulted in a net return of over £20.

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Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Thursday 7 November 1901, page 4


| Education Department.

Transfers of Teachers.

The Executive Council yesterday approved of the following transfers of teachers :

Judith Malone, re-admitted as teacher in class 3, division 2, and appointed assistant teacher at Chinchilla State school ;

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Friday 15 November 1901, page 6


CHINCHILLA DIP.

Tho assistant inspector of stock, Mr. B. F. Wood, in charge of the new dip erected by the Agricultural Department at Chinchilla, reports that the first mob of cattle, 700 head from Palm Tree Creek, Taroom have been put through the dip at the rate of 187 head per hour, with the most successful results, and without a mishap. An examination for ticks did not reveal the presence of any. Some seventeen horses were also dipped._

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Friday 15 November 1901, page 2


A 'telegram' was received to-day, stating that Mr. John Young Black, of The Park, Chinchilla, sustained a serious accident through his horse falling, and rolling on him. Dr. Stewart has been driven up by Mr. De Stokan.

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Darling Downs Gazette (Qld. : 1881 - 1922), Saturday 16 November 1901, page 3


THE ACCIDENT AT CHINCHILLA.

Mr. J. Y. Black, who was severely injured through being thrown from a horse last Tues-day, was brought into Dalby on Wednesday, and taken to the Royal Hotel, where he was attended by Dr. Stewart. The old gent's injuries have happily proved to be less severe than first thought, and he is progressing satisfactorily.

(Makes me think of the time Dad went to buy a horse, and it was described as ‘good for an old man like you.” He was insulted and left post haste.)

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Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Tuesday 19 November 1901, page 2


The Dalby Herald" reports that Mr. J. Y. Black met with a very severe accident whilst riding at Chinchilla on Tuesday morning. It is supposed that his horse bucked him out of the saddle and he fell on the pommel, inflicting internal injuries. Mr. Black was brought to Dalby on Wednesday afternoon's train, and has been assiduously attended by Dr. Stewart. Tho doctor informs us that the patient has received a fractured pelvis, but no internal injuries, and we are pleased to state that up to last night the patient was doing very well, and hopes are now entertained of an early recovery.

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Queensland Figaro (Brisbane, Qld. : 1901 - 1936), Thursday 21 November 1901, page 7

Mr. John Black, of " The Park," Chinchilla, has been visiting friends at Dalby.

(Really?)

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Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1860 - 1947), Tuesday 3 December 1901, page 3


From Gayndah to Chinchilla the road travels through remarkably beautiful country for the first 100 miles, and in the whole journey there is not a patch as steep as Wharf Street. But the Wambo Board sadly neglects to do anything, and the wail of the carrier is long and sulphurous from Fogarty's, Ormond, through the fifty-one miles of pine scrub and sand, with delectable spots like Hell-Hole and Speculation. If Brisbane people wish to secure this grand field for development, especially the Upper Burnett, Chinchilla is the key, a sand-stricken, weary place, with two pubs, and 150 pigs at large !

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Monday 9 December 1901, page 8


POPULATION OF TOWNS.

THE CENSUS RETURNS.

The following figures show the population in towns containing 100 inhabitants and upwards,

Chinchilla 336,

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Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser (Qld. : 1875 - 1902), Thursday 19 December 1901, page 3


The Weather.

A Heat Wave. PHENOMENAL HEAT.

HIGHEST EVER REGISTERED IN TOOWOOMBA.

103 DEG. ON TUESDAY, and 104.8 DEG. YESTERDAY. PREVIOUS RECORD— 99 DEG.

114 DEG. ON TUESDAY BELOW THE RANGE. 106 AT PITTSWORTH

TERRIFIC HEAT ALL OVER QUEENS-LAND.

The weather during the past two days has been the hottest ever experienced in Toowoomba. Before last Tuesday never in the history of Toowoomba has the shade temperature ranched three figures.

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In the late Mr. Nehemiah Bartley's interesting book on reminiscences of Aus-tralian life entitled Opals and Agates, ap-pears a description of a trip made by that gentleman and Mr. R. Meston (uncle of Mr. A. Meston) to the Darling Downs in December, 1854. Speaking of the weather experienced on the occasion, Mr. Bartley says: — " It was 108 deg. at Warwick on 13th December 13; the same at Clifton next day, grass all burnt and yellow ; 110 deg. at Drayton the following day, and here I resolved to stop till the hot wind was over. I may mention that during three days it was 117 deg., 119 deg., and 122 deg. in the shade at Chinchilla, and 112 deg. at Franklyn Vale, below the Range.

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