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COMMUNAL SETTLEMENTS NEAR CHINCHILLA IN THE 1890S......PART 1


 ILLUSTRATION IS OF A 'HOUSE' AT MIZPAH

INTRODUCTION

In 1893, The Queensland Government passed the CO-OPERATIVE COMMUNITIES BILL (see Appendix 1), which set up the Co-Operative Communal Settlement Scheme. Within 6 months, 3 such communal settlements had been established close to Chinchilla. This was apparently partly in response to increasing levels of unemployment in the cities, and also to a growing interest in a socialist movement among unions, and the parts of the educated public (see Appendices 2 and 3).

During recent months I have trawled the records of Queensland newspapers, gathering records and stories about these three settlements –Mizpah; Monmouth; and Industrial (later Mulga). What follows does not include all such reports, as often the same information was repeated almost word-for-word in several different publications. There may also be others I have not located.

My source was the website TROVE, which holds copies of newspapers of the time. Pages have been photographed, and the text then digitized. But the old papers are often faded and/or smudged, and the digitization is rarely 100% accurate. I have compared the digitized text with the original photographs, and made such corrections as I felt were reasonable. Any errors in these corrections are my responsibility.

So what appears below are my readings of the origin photographs of the newspapers between 1893 and 1896.

 

 


 

Getting started

Western Star and Roma Advertiser (Qld. : 1875 - 1948), Saturday 4 November 1893, page 2

. We learn on very good authority that the first Co-operative Community, under the Act passed during the last session of Parliament, is to be established at Chinchilla. The land has been officially reserved, and is now under inspection by officials of the movement, which is under the auspices of the Salvation Army, Brisbane. The site is adjacent to the township of Chinchilla and alongside the railway line, the scope of country ample and watered by Charley's creek and the Condamine River. It is understood that the settlement will consist of 41 members at present enrolled, each being allotted 80 acres.

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Western Star and Roma Advertiser (Qld. : 1875 - 1948), Saturday 4 November 1893, page 2

THE MOST FORWARD GROUP.

By far the most forward group is the "Mizpah," which numbers thirty-five men, of whom only three are single. Twenty-one are soldiers of the Salvation Army, the others being drawn from different Churches. They are all known to each other, and represent the following trades :— Carpenters, farmers, bush labourers, sawyers, dairymen, and a blacksmith. They belong almost solely to the Paddington district, and are certainly a fine body of men. Their average age is about 30 years. The principle on which they intend working is thus given by their secretary :— "We mean to govern the community on the co-operative principle, and each man will have an equal voice in the management. There will be a foreman of works and a committee of six to superintend operations. These will be elected annually, and by a majority of votes. We shall have a co-operative store on the settlement. Houses will be erected for every family, one acre of land being allowed for the private use of each. The remainder will be cultivated and worked jointly. We do not propose to allow the produce of the acre which we allot each family to be sold. It must be used by the person growing or handed over to the community. Such money or rations as the Government may give us will be 'lumped,' each member bearing his proportion of the debt. No one's religious principles will be interfered with but we strictly prohibit the use of alcohol except as a "medicine." It transpires that their committee have visited a site offered them, and are greatly pleased with it. The settlement, which is situated about two and a-half miles from Chinchilla, is abundantly and permanently watered by Charley's Creek and waterholes, the soil being a rich sandy loam, and the land lightly timbered with box and gum. It abuts the railway line, and access to the centres of population thus made is easy. While for the most part members of the Salvation Army, they are not by any means influenced or controlled by the officials of that organisation, and act quite independently of them. It should also be mentioned that the members of the "Mizpah" Group are exceedingly pleased with the assistance lent them by the Government, and do not make a complaint of any kind.

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A PROCLAMATION. By His Excellency General Sir HENRY WYLIE NORMAN, Knight Grand Cross of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Knight Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, Governor. Companion of the Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Colony of Queensland and its Dependencies.

IN pursuance and execution of all powers and  authorities in me vested under the provisions of " The Co-operative Communities Land Settlement Act of 1893," I, Sir HENRY WYLIE NORMAN, the Governor aforesaid, by and with the advice of the Executive Council, do, by this my Proclamation, set apart the Area hereinafter mentioned for the purposes of a Group, subject to the particulars and conditions hereinafter contained, that is to say :-

SCHEDULE. 1. The name of the Group shall be "The Mizpah Group."

2. The names of the persons included in the said Group are as follow:-

1. Thomas H. Fallows

2. William J . Bennett

 

3. Frank Harry Jones

4. Joseph Johnson

 

5. John Daniels 

6. Robert Fisher

 

7. Maurice Nelson Cathcart

8. George Phillips

 

9. Henry Woodward

10. William Jory

 

11. William James Shipton

12. Walter Mason

 

13. George Shield

14. John Falconer

 

15. William Goostrey

16. Henry Malmede

 

17. Carl Fischer

18. Albert W. Plummer

 

19. Jonathan Gledhill

20. Thomas Henry Masters

 

21. Robert Mallabar

22. William Francis Stanaway

 

23. Ernst Johann Heinrich Brockmann

24. Thomas Allen

 

25. Albert Merritt

26. John V. Garnett

 

27. Henry Smith

28. Walter Dummer

 

29. Fredrick Bristow

30. Thomas Budgen

 

31. Walter Hopwood

32. Charles Batterbee

 

33. Joseph A. G. Kerr

34. Thomas Harswood

 

35. J. L. Campbell.

 

 

3. (a.) The area shall be about 4,000 acres, comprised within the boundaries hereinafter described :-Commencing at the south-east corner of portion 2v, parish of Chinchilla, and bounded thence on the west by that portion, the Chinchilla Town Reserve, and portion 1562 northerly to Charley's Creek, by that creek upwards about twenty-five chains in a direct line to a point two miles from the Western Railway ; thence on the north- east by a line south-easterly parallel with and distant two miles from that railway about three miles ; on the east by a line south about two miles fourteen chains ; and thence on the southwest by a line parallel with and distant five chains from the Western Railway north-westerly to the point of commencement ;--inclusive of land required for roads, reserves , or other public purpose. (b.) Each member will be permitted to acquire the freehold of any area , not exceeding 100 acres, at the expiration of the period hereinafter mentioned.

4. The sum of ten shillings per acre shall be expended by the said Group in making improvements on the area, and such improvements shall be of a substantial and permanent nature to the satisfaction of the Minister.

5. (a.) The area shall be set apart for a period of eight years from the first day of January, 1894. (b.) The rent charged shall be at the rate of one shilling and eightpence per acre per annum, commencing at the end of the third year of the period, and shall be accounted as the purchasing price for the acquisition of the freehold of the said area or any part thereof at the end of the said period.

6. The said period shall be divided into four equal portions of two years, and within three months before the expiration of every such portion during the said period an inspection of the improvements on the said area will be made by the Commissioner.

7. (a.) Timber may be cut by any member of the said Group on the subdivision of the said area occupied by him for the purpose of making improvements thereon, but not for sale.(b.) Timber can only be cut on the unoccupied portion of the said area by permission of the Commissioner, but no timber shall in any case be cut for sale by the members of the said Group. (c.) The total money aid under section 33 shall be four hundred and twenty pounds (£420), repayable, on demand, within the first three years of the said period, with 5 per centum per annum interest added. (d.) No allowances will be made to individual members of the said Group under section 34. E.M.-22-11-93.

Given under my Hand and Seal, at Government House, Brisbane, this twenty-second day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, and in the fifty-seventh year of Her Majesty 's reign. By Command, A. H. BARLOW. GOD SAVE THE QUEEN

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Western Star and Roma Advertiser (Qld. : 1875 - 1948), Saturday 4 November 1893, page 2

The first group to take advantage of the Co-operative Land Settlement Act will be | the " Mizpah" Group. The Minister for Lands has agreed to allot them a piece of land consisting of 4000 acres at Chinchilla, and though the majority of the members belong to the Salvation Army, the settlement will in no way be under control of the headquarters of the army. About 500 acres will be set aside as reserves for roads and other purposes, and the thirty-five members forming the group will have 100 acres each, which will become freehold if the conditions of settlement and repayment to the Government have been carried out. Financial assistance has been granted by the Government to the company to the extent of £420, for the purchase of food, tools, seed, etc. This cash assistance mast be repaid at the end of three years, and the group will be charged 5 per cent on the amount. Everything is now ready for an immediate start.

A few pioneers will go forward first, to be followed by the main body. The settlers will live in a village community, in which each member will be allotted an acre of land. On this acre he may grow what he likes for his own use, but should he exceed his own requirements he will not be allowed to sell for his own benefit. All produce raised beyond what he can consume will be for the good of the community, and the proceeds will go into the general fund.

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Western Star and Roma Advertiser (Qld. : 1875 - 1948), Saturday 4 November 1893, page 2

Co-operative Land Settlement

From Mr. T. H. Fallows, of Alma street, Paddington, the secretary of the "Mizpah" Co-operative Land Settlement Group, the following particulars concerning the formation and progress of that group, which is the first to come to anything definite, were learned by a Telegraph reporter on Friday.

The "Mizpah" group consists of 35 members, only five of whom are single men, the rest being all married men with families, the children numbering something liko 100. The average age of the members of the group is about 30 years. .As regards the occupation, of the members of the group, there are several carpenters, a blacksmith, come farmers and bushmen, besides one or two other trades. The majority of the members of the group are members of the Salvation Army, but it should be stated that the group is not under the control in any way of the Salvation Army head-quarters. The remainder of the members have been drafted from various churches in and around Brisbane.

The group has all along been well ahead of other groups in its formation and perfection, and now it may be said they have within reach of their grasp the end they have sought to reach. Application was made some time ago to the Minister for Lands for the allotment to them of a piece of land consisting of 4,000 acres, near Chinchilla, and now they have been informed that their application has been granted. About 500 acres will be set aside as reserves for roads and other purposes, thus leaving about 100 acres for each member, which, at the end  of  eight years will become his freehold if the conditions of settlement and repayment to the Government have been carried out.

Any term between six and twelve years might have  been chosen, but the group decided on eight  years as a reasonable tune in which they could discharge their responsibility to  the Government.  The purchase money for the land is fixed at 10s per acre; which is repayable in four instalments, the first instalments being due at the end of the third year; the conditions of the Act in respect of  improvements, at  the rate of 2s, 6d, per acre being required to be carried out. The Government have granted  financial assistance to the company to the amount of £420 to be disbursed through the Department of Agriculture in the purchase of means to provide selter, implements, tools, seed, etc., and food. This is equal to £12 per member. Although the money will not in any case be handed over to the members, and, must be expended through the Department of Agriculture, yet it is understood that the department will be open to suggestion as to market, &c,, from the group. This cash assistance must be repaid at the end of three years, and the group will be charged 5 per cent on the amount. The  members are of  opinion that they have been rather closely dealt with in this respect, but notwithstanding, the secretary stated they have determined to go into the matter with a good spirit,  and make it a success. This was the feeling  of a meeting of the members held a few nights back, when it was felt that by hard work and perseverance, with a little tact and management, they would be able to make the money spin out.

With regard to the land itself, Mr. Fallows pointed out that it had been inspected by some of the members, who were quite satisfied with it. It is situated on the Brisbane. side, and distant about 2 and a half miles from  Chinchilla railway station. One side of the selection borders on the Western Railway line, and the land backs onto Charley's Creek in undulating ridges. The creek will supply ample water, and besides there are numerous waterholes. A thousand acres are covered with heavy brigalow scrub, with rich black soil. This, it is believed, will be very good for cereal crops. Another part of the settlement consists of rich, sandy loam, which the settlers intend to use for raising  all kinds of fruit, grapes, and vegetables. Other country is suitable for grazing purposes. The  timber on the sandy loam consists of box and gum.

Everything is now ready for an immediate start, and immediately the group is proclaimed, which will be probably in the first issue of the “Government Gazette" after next meeting of the Executive Council, the first steps will be taken. A few pioneers will go first, to be soon followed by the main body. Application was to be made for tents to the Government, but it is understood that the tents cannot be loaned, and the groups will have to provide their own. Slab huts will replace the tents as soon as practicable, and when the property of the group is assured the humpies will become kitchens to cottages. It is the intention of the group to go m for wheat growing in particular and general farming. The settlers will live in a village, community, in which each member will be allotted an acre of  land. On this acre he may grow what he likes  for his own use, but should he exceed his own requirements he will not be allowed to sell for his own benefit. All produce raised beyond what  he can consume will be for the good of the community, and the proceeds will go into the general fund.

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the railway line forms the boundary of one side of the land, whilst the other side is bounded by Charlie's Creek. Of the nature of the land  very little is so far definitely known, but it is believed that it comprises Western Star and Roma Advertiser (Qld. : 1875 - 1948), Saturday 4 November 1893, page 2

Co-operative Communities. THE LOCAL GROUPS.

Ipswich is not apparently going to be behind the times in taking advantage of the provisions of the Co-operative Communities Land Settlement Act passed last session, for preliminary atpse (sic) towards the formation of two groups have been taken by residents of the town and suburbs. About two months ago Mr. Daniel Williams, a blacksmith. employed for many years at Messers. S. Shillito and Son's foundry, mooted the question of forming a community on the co-operative principle, and since then the matter has been taken up in earnest, and satisfactory progress has been made. Through the courtesy of Mr. A. P. Cameron, Land Commissioner, a document was allowed to lie at the Land Office so that it might be formally signed by those willing to join the group Though members were secured very slowly at first, the list has now filled, and closed with thirty-nine names. Meetings of the men have from time to time been held, and the pros and cons of the project fully discussed, and no time has been lost in arranging the necessary details and complying with the provisions of the Act. The combination has been named the Monmouth Settlement Group.

Things have so far advanced that the land for the settlement has, we understand, been allotted, this being situated at Chinchilla, and only some three miles from that about to be occupied by the Mizpah Group. The country is said to be in close proximity to the railway -in fact, one of the men tells us that a brigalow flat. To ascertain the true character of their future home, and at the same time with the view of doing a little prospecting, two of the members of the settlement have born told off to visit the locality, and they will probably leave town with this object during the present week.

The men forming the group are all described as hard working, industrious men, and the majority of them have resided in this town and district for some years--in fact, one member has, we are informed, held the position of gardener for a well-known resident of Ipswich for some five years. Some are tradesmen--including two blacksmiths and a carpenter--another is a butcher, while most of the others are handy bush men, who have been accustomed to manual, outdoor labour, such as fencing, farming, road-making, dairying, and general labourers' work; indeed, not one among the number can be put down as a real "deadhead," though some have not, through mis-fortune, been in permanent employment. A few of the men, by thrift, have acquired a small amount of property--such, for instance, as horses, cows, pigs, &c., and these would be of service to the group if they could get them conveyed to the land by rail free of charge.

On this and other matters several members interviewed the Hon. A. H. Barlow (Minister for Lands and author of the Act) on Saturday evening last, when they were most cordially received. Mr. Barlow spoke very favourably of the body of men constituting the Monmouth Group, and, touching the matter of the free carriage of the stock mentioned, he stated that no arrangements for doing this had so far been made, the free transit of the members of groups and their chattels being the only thing provided for. In talking over the matter yesterday with the promoter (Mr. Williams), he stated that he and others forming the group were making a living at their present employment, but were of opinion that a better one might be obtained as a result of the settlement. The group contains members holding Socialistic views, but they have signified their willingness to "bury the hatchet" until the land becomes the property of the group.

We hope that the  Monmouth Group may prove a success, for its formation will, to some extent, reduce the ranks of the unemployed in this district. For the guidance and efficient management of the group rules have been drawn up, containing some twenty-five clauses. These provide that the group shall be comprised of three committees--to give directions as to all moneys received and to control the expenditure and stores; to superintend all land cultivated, the crops on the same, and their disposal; and to erect and supervise all fencing, dwellings, and shelters in the group. The working hours shall be from 6a.m. till 6 p.m. and to 1 p.m. on Saturdays, during the summer months-from October till March; and in the winter months--from April till September, the hours are to be from 8 a m. till 5 p.m., and to 1 p.m. on Saturday. The members are to assemble once a welk for the transaction of all business, and a record is to be kept of the same. The freehold of the land, as prescribed by rule 10, is to be acquired in six years after the commencement of operations.

The holidays provided for are Good Friday, Easter Monday, Christmas Day, New Year's Day, and Separation Day. All property and implements, at the end of the period, are to be sold by auction, the nett proceeds to be equally divided among the group. The members, believing in temperance principles, have decided by rule that no intoxicating drink shall be sold or manufactured on the settlement, while those committing immoral offences render themselves liable to expulsion. A board, consisting of five members, including the secretary, is to decide all disputes of a civil nature arising in the area, and the money raised by fines is to be placed to an hospital fund. A store is to be opened on the settlement, and the rations are to be retailed to members at cost price, while an acre of land will be allotted to each member for household purposes. Each squad of men will be in charge of a foreman, who will book each man's time, all lost time to be deducted out of the profits. No member will be allowed to work outside the area except on contracts undertaken by the secretary on behalf of the group. 

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Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1908), Tuesday 12 December 1893, page 4

The Monmouth Settlement Group.

MEETING OF THE MEMBERS. A meeting of the members of the Monmouth group, formed in this town under the provisions of the Co-operative Communities Land Settlement Act of 1893, was held, in their room, Limestone street, on Friday evening last. There was a good attendance of the men, and the originator and secretary (Mr. Daniel Williams) occupied the chair. The delegates (Messrs. J. S Royal and B. Ward) appointed to inspect the areas allotted to the group at Chinchilla were present, and the principal object of the meeting was to receive their report.

The Chairman , having explained the purpose for which the meeting had been convened, read the report of the delegates. The report was divided into three sections, three separate areas having been inspected by the delegates.

The statement in reference to No. 1 went to show that the country was level, with slight elevations; that the timber consisted of B box (sic), apple tree, gum, blood-wood, brigalow, and iron-bark; that water was plentiful, there being lagoons, Charley's Creek, and Branch creeks; that the soil was from black up to red in colour; that the nearest point to the railway was two and a half miles, and the farthest six and a half miles; and that the flood-marks visible were not above 12in. in height,. and, in their opinion, were caused by the overflow of lagoons and creeks. 

Mr. ROYAL further explained the nature of the country, and illustrated his remarks by a diagram and plan on the wall. He said that on neighbouring land—and even on the portion alloted to the group--there were cattle grazing which were too fat to get out of their own road, while they saw apples fully 9in. in circumference which had been grown on the farms in the vicinity. There were also peaches, tomatoes, and other fruit in abundance.

- No. 2 report stated that the country consisted of iron-bark ridges, with box and apple tree flats, as well as brigalow scrub; that the timber was the same as in No. I area; that the soil was black near the river; that there was no water except near the Condamine; that the flood-marks on the trees showed 10ft. to 30ft, caused by the overflowing of the Condamine.

The report on No. 3 area stated that the country was flat, with slight ridges towards the railway, with deep melon-holes; that there were also dense belar oak and brigalow scrub in the middle; that on one part there was no water available nearer than six miles ; that there were some very good flats, but they were not sufficient in area; and that a bridge would have to be made across either the Rocky or Charley's Creek, so as to get to Chinchilla.

The delegates expressed their thanks to Constable Higman and Mr. Surveyor Shield, both of whom spared neither themselves nor horses to give them the fullest information in their power.

 Samples of the soil from the areas were produced, and were thoroughly inspected by the members, that from No. 1 area being invariably spoken of as the best. The matter was discussed in a conversational manner, and, on a show of hands being taken, No. 1 area was unanimously adopted.

Mr. ATKINS thought that the members of the group should pass a hearty vote of thanks to the delegates, and he moved to that effect, which was carried with acclamation. Votes of thanks were tendered to the press and for the Chairman, after which the meeting adjourned till Friday evening next.

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Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1908), Tuesday 12 December 1893, page 4

CO-OPERATIVE COMMUNITIES.

LAND IN THE CONDAMINE DISTRICT. THE MONMOUTH (IPSWICH) GROUP.

At a meeting of the members comprising the Monmouth Land Settlement Group held in Ipswich, the principal business was to hear the report of the delegates (Messrs. J. S. Royal and R. Ward) who had returned from  their tour of inspection of the country at Chinchilla. They reported upon three areas. Tho first piece inspected was situated about two and a-half miles from Chinchilla. . Tho land was fairly level, but there is slight elevation in parts. Tho timber which grows on the place is of blood, box, apple-tree, gum, bloodwood, brigalow, and ironwood. There is plenty of water on the place, there being an abundant supply in a large lagoon, while this is supplemented by Branch and Charlie’s Creeks. The soil is from black to red in colour, and is of a chocolate loamy nature, and unlike the black clay which abounds in many parts of West Moreton. Samples were exhibited, dug at a depth of from 0in. to 2ft. The land is an open forest with brigalow patches, but there is an absence of timber for building requirements, but any amount can be obtained just at the back for this purpose Tho flood marks show that the water was not more than 12in. on the place during the largest  known flood, and this was no doubt caused by the overflow of the lagoon and the Creek, in consequence of the very heavy rains. Tho nearest point to the railway is two and a-half miles distant, and the furthest point six miles distant.

The person owning the adjoining area had the grazing right of the land under consideration, and his stock was in really splendid condition ; they were fat and heavy. At a distance the land appears of a very hungry nature, as vegetation does not appear to luxuriate, but on examination the soil is found to be of first-class description. Plenty of fish abound in the creeks, while the place is "almost alive" with wild duck. Tho banks of the crook will have to be cut down to make it passable for dray traffic Tho delegates saw apples grown in the neighbourhood by a Mr. Turner, the fruit measuring 9in. in circumference, while peaches, grapes, and other fruit are grown in abundance. Maize was found 5ft. or 6ft. high, tomatoes are very plentiful, and tobacco grows extremely well. The only drawback is that it has no railway frontage, while the Mizpah group has three or four miles of frontage to the permanent way.

The delegates also inspected an area near the river Condamine. Tho country consists of ironbark ridges and box and apple-tree flats and brigalow scrub, while it is broken country. General sorts of timber are met with, similar to these described above, while the soil is also of a like description. The only available water is from the Condamine, and when this stream overflows it floods the land to a depth of from 10ft. to 30ft. It is situated on the opposite side of the railway to No. 1, and is four miles from it.

No3 inspection was of soma land about three miles and a-half from Chinchilla'. It is flat country with slight ridges towards the railway, and has a considerable number of large melon-holes. It has a dense Balah oak and brigalow scrub in the middle ; while it is subject to inundation both from Rocky and Charlie's Creeks, and likewise from the Condamine River. It is forest land, but the nearest water is six miles away, while the land is not sufficient in area. There are all descriptions of soil, from ballast to very patchy clay. To this area there would have to be a detour made to get to Chinchilla, and some bridgework would have to be done.

Tho delegates gave graphic descriptions of the lands inspected, which they illustrated on a lithograph map drawn on a scale of two miles to the inch. They alluded in eulogistic terms to the manner in which they were assisted by Constable Higman (land agent) and surveyor Mr. Shield, who spared neither themselves nor their horses to assist them and give them (the visitors) the fullest information at their disposal. Some general conversation took place on the reports, and the secretary  was instructed, to send in an application for the land described in inspection No. 1. This the secretary (Mr. Williams) has done.

A letter has been received by the secretary (Mr. Williams), under Friday's date, from the Under Secretary of the Department of Agriculture, in reply to one which had been sent from the group. The letter stated that articles of household furniture of members of the group would be carried free, but not musical instruments, wardrobes, marble articles, bookcases, or mirrors, except toilet glasses. Stock of any kind, if conveyed by railway, will have to be paid for, and the subject of freight thereto became a matter for the members of the group to consider.

 All money granted by the Government would be disbursed by the Department, and no money would be paid to the groups in coin. Every suggestion from the groups would receive careful consideration, fruit trees and tools of trade belonging to the blacksmith would also be carried free. The two delegates are very sanguine of the adaptability of the land selected for the purpose for which it is intended, and it will doubtless not be long before the pioneers of the settlement set to work.

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Friday 5 January 1894, page 4

The Mizpah Group of co-operators having heard that it is reported in Brisbane they have collapsed have written to the Under Secretary for Agriculture to inform him they are getting on very well, and are sanguine of success.

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Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Saturday 6 January 1894, page 2

Mizpar Group. News from Chinchilla.

'The secretary of the Mizpah community, writing under date January 2, says :I would like to let you know how we are getting on up here. I think it would be of interest to your readers. I have heard it has been rumoured in Brisbane that the group is a failure, but I am glad to say that we are getting on well. The party  with the cattle arrived here last Thursday. They state that the country is in a bad state for grass, and they had to do some very long stages, but taking everything on the whole they managed tolerably well. The settlement is situated on a very nice ridge, and the soil is of a red sandy loam, which is very suitable for a kitchen garden, or fruit trees, especially grapes.

Some of our members who were fortunate enough to have seeds have planted, and in about a week from planting the plants were well above ground. We have had supplied from Brisbane different kinds of kitchen garden seeds, and as soon as rain comes are going to plant. The country is very dry, and is badly in want of rain. I am told that this is the driest  season experienced for some years, but not withstanding this, everything seems to flourish.

The stock running round the settlement are rolling fat. Just outside the settlement we have a paddock fenced in with wallaby proof fence, and cleared to the extent of five or six acres, which we are planting with maize supplied to us from the Department  of Agriculture'. Although rather late in the day for planting maize, we think we will reap a crop of it.

On the settlement is erected a substantial store of split brigalow slabs, with iron roof (size 24 x 12), which enables us to store all it all we require. Also, we have erected a butcher's shop 12 by 12 with rushes for a roof, three or four bundles deep, which will keep the meat very cool. The settlement consumes at the rate of a bullock a week of about 700 lbs. weight; but at present we find, it rather hard to keep it on account of the close weather we are having. I am glad to say that we have a never-failing supply of fresh water from the lagoons and the creek. The members are quite satisfied with the land, and are all in good spirits  and in fair health, and are determined to leave nothing undone, to make the scheme a success. On the other side of the settlement is a bit of ground selected for potatoes, about 70 acres. We are going to plant it in February. Everything at present tends to success, and I am sure we shall,  given favourable seasons, make it a success.

The store, I may say, is run on very economic lines, but still everyone seems satisfied with the supplies as they are served out. We are starting to erect some of the huts, and in the space of a few months there will be a different aspect of affairs.

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Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Wednesday 10 January 1894, page 2

Co-operative Communities. Industrial Group.

Delegates from the proposed Industrial cooperative community will shortly inspect an area of land on Warra run resumption, a little on the Brisbane side of Chinchilla. This group numbers about 49 members. Most of the members are Brisbane residents, and the group are bettor provided with capital than most of those already formed or in course of formation.

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Tuesday 23 January 1894, page 4

CO-OPERATIVE SETTLEMENT.

The Monmouth group of co-operative settlers, consisting of thirty-five settlers, will probably be gazetted this week. The group has been granted 3700 acres of land near  Chinchilla, close to the site chosen by the Mizpah group. A pioneer party will go out to take up the land this week. The applications for land in the Burnett district made by the Resolute and the Byrnestown groups have been approved by the Government.

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A PROCLAMATION. By His Excellency General Sir HENRY WYLIE NORMAN, Knight Grand Cross of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Knight Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, Companion of the Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, ; Governor and Commander-inChief of the Colony of Queensland and its Dependencies.

IN pursuance and execution of all powers and authorities in me vested under the provisions of "The Co-operative Communities Land Settlement Act of 1893," I, Sir HENRY WYLIE NORMAN, the Governor aforesaid, by and with the advice of the Executive Council, do, by this my Proclamation, set apart the Area hereinafter mentioned for the purposes of a Group, subject to the particulars and conditions hereinafter contained, that is to say :--- E.M.-24-I-94.

SCHEDULE. 1. The name of the Group shall be "The Monmouth Group."

2. The names of the persons included in the said Group are as follow :-

1. Daniel Williams

2. William Charles

 3. James Thomas Fitzgerald

4. John Samuel Royal

 5. Charles James Frankling

6. George Radbourn

7. Harry Clemant Sutton

8. Walter Atkins

9. Arthur Stockwell

10. Richard Albert Ward

11. Patrick O'Shea, junr .

12. William Barnes

13. David John Mackenzie

14. James Kemp

15. Victor Ferdinand Lloyd

16. James Kidd Gill

17. Michael O'Shea

18. George Pearce

19. Thomas Henry Garner

20. William Hickey

21. James Mulholland

22. William Hall

23. John Boyce

24. Henry Wilkin

25. James Kempthorne

26. Patrick O'Shea

27. William Yates

28. James Murphy.

29 George Grace

30. William Yates, junr..

31 Patrick Burnell

32. Alexander Greig

 33. William Yarwood

34. Thomas Lupton

35. Harry Johnsen.

 

3. (a.) The area shall be about 3,700 acres, in the parish of Colamba, county of Lytton, Dalby Land Agent's District, comprised within the boundaries hereinafter described:-Commencing at the confluence of Branch and Charley's Creeks, and bounded thence on the south-east by Charley' s Creek downwards about 300 chains in a direct line; on the west by a line north about 420 chains to Branch Creek; and thence on the north- east by that creek downwards to the point of commencement ;-inclusive of land required for roads, reserves , or other public purpose, (b.) Each member will be permitted to acquire the freehold of any area not exceeding 100 acres at the expiration of the period hereinafter mentioned.

4. The sum of ten shillings per acre shall be expended by the said Group in making improvements on the said area, andsuch improvements shall be of a substantial and permanent nature to the satisfaction of the Minister.

5 (a.) The said area shall be set apart for a period of six years from the First day of January, 1894.

(b.) Rent shall be paid by the said Group on 3,500 acres, at the rate of one shilling and eightpence per acre per annum

for the whole of the said period, payable in equal instalments at the end of each of the four latter years of the said period, and

shall be accounted as the purchasing price for the acquisition of the freehold of the said area, or any part thereof, at the end

of the said period.

6. The said period shall be divided into four equal portions of one year and six months, and within three months before the expiration of every such portion during the said period an inspection of the improvements on the said area will be made by the Commissioner.

 

7. (a.) Timber may be cut by any member of the said Group on the subdivision of the said area occupied by him for the purpose of making improvements thereon, but not for sale.

(b) Timber can only be cut on the unoccupied portion of the said area by permission of the Commissioner, but no timber

shall in any case be cut for sale by the members of the said Group.

(c.) The total money aid under section 33 shall be £420, repayable, on demand, within the first three years of the said period, with 5 ,per centum per annum interest added.

(d.) No allowances will be made to individual members of the said Group under section 34.

Given under my Hand and Seal, at Government House, Brisbane, this twenty-fourth day of January, in the

year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four

By Command, A. H. BARLOW.

……………………………………..

Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Friday 26 January 1894, page 4

INDUSTRIAL CO-OPERATIVE GROUP.

A well-attended meeting of the Industrial Group was held at the European Restaurant, Petrie's Bight, on Tuesday evening. The delegates appointed to select a suitable site for the future settlement reported that they had inspected an area of land on the Warra resumption, situated almost midway between the townships of Warra and Chinchilla. The land embraced both sides of the railway line, and ran back southward to the Condamine River and Cooranga Creek, to both of which it had a good frontage. It was also watered by Jinghi Jinghi Creek. The area consisted of open plains, forest, and brigalow scrub ; the soil, which was of average quality, varied in character, from stiff black soil to sandy loam. They considered the area marked out to be suitable for the purposes of the settlement, and recommended that an application be lodged with the Government for the same. The delegates spoke highly of the courtesy shown them by Mr. Evans, the Crown lands ranger, and of his untiring efforts to assist them in marking out a suitable site. After numerous questions had been asked and answered it was unanimously decided that the report and recommendations of the delegates be adopted, and that an application be lodged with the Government forth-with. It was also resolved that the best thanks of the group be tendered to the ranger for the valuable assistance rendered to the delegates.

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Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1908), Tuesday 30 January 1894, page 5

The Industrial Co-operative Settlement Group, which has selected land at Warra, has room for one or two more members, with a capital of £50. Further particulars can be obtained on application to the secretary, Mr. W. Floyd, O'Connell town, near Brisbane.

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Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Friday 2 February 1894, page 3

VILLAGE SETTLEMENT. TO THE EDITOR.

Sir-A large number of people went up from Ipswich in the train for the Chinchilla Village Settlement on the evening of the 20th of January. It is much to be deplored that their time and labour is to be devoted to a land so unworthy of their efforts. You hear a good deal from Mr. Barlow and other prominent men about settling the people on the land. I am afraid in the true sense of the word it will settle them. The land is unfruitful and unsuited for general agricultural purposes. If the Government want to do a meritorious act and assist to bring the country out of its present depressed state, why do they not settle the people upon land that will be worthy of their toil ? There are hundreds of thousands of acres of land very much nearer the centres of civilisation, and of a rich agricultural description, that could be allotted to village settlement, where the labourers could reap a just return for their spirited venture.

I maintain that the Chinchilla land is unsuited for the purpose for which it is intended, and in the course of a short time it will be discovered that a vast amount of honest labour has been thrown away for no purpose, causing a greater amount of misery than at present exists among the willing sons of the soil. I could suggest many places far better suited for village settlement, but no doubt the Minister for Lands and his staff of officials are better acquainted with lands within his jurisdiction than an outsider.

 I am Sir: A. V. Chinchilla, 28th January,

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Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 2 February 1894, page 10

Mizpah. Group. Sanguine of Success.

A letter received in Brisbane from a member, of the Mizpah Co-operative Group describes in cheerful and sanguine language what the members are doing on their land near Chinchilla. The writer says that the members agree splendidly and work well together. They are worrying the soil and the trees instead of the Lands Department. A storehouse, butcher's shop, shoemaker's shop, and the secretary's office have been erected, and two humpies are nearly completed. About 6 acres of maize have been planted, and the land fenced. Next month (February) about 20 acres of potatoes are to be planted. The land is being cleared and enclosed with a two-rail fence, and the plough is at work. It is expected that a good market will be got locally for all the potatoes that can be grown. The group have secured the contract for running the mail between the settlement and Durah. They intend to open a store for the convenience of the surrounding settlers. The "Mizpah" brands of butter, raisins, and boots, a varied range of products, are expected to become famous in time. The land is described as really splendid, and capable of growing anything "from a pumpkin to a stack of wheat." A satisfactory sentence in the letter is that in which it is stated that the settlers do not want money.

…………………………………….

Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Saturday 3 February 1894, page 200

Co-operative Settlement Groups.

A proclamation appeared in Saturday's "Government Gazette" notifying that 3700 acres in the parish of Colamba, county of Lytton, Dalby land agent's district, had been set apart under the " Co-operative Communities Land Settlement Act of 1893," for the Monmouth Group. Also, 4100 acres in the parish of Rolleston, county of Denison, Springsure land agent's district, for the Reliance Group. The names of the persons included in the groups were also published. (see above)

The members of the Monmouth Co-operative Settlement group (formed in Ipswich) have so far completed their arrangements that the pioneer party reached their destination on Saturday morning. Mainly through the active interest taken in the project by the Rev. A. Horan, numerous donations both in money and goods have been received by the group, and at a meeting held last week very cordial appreciation of his help was expressed. Father Horan, in replying, said that it was true that he had taken great interest in the group. The reason why he had done so was because he was glad to see that the people were going on the land. There was no way that they could settle down more comfortably than by doing that. He hoped to see the whole of them at Chinchilla before long and in their own homes. From what he had heard from a gentleman who had paid the members of the Mizpah Group a visit, the members of that body were doing well and were perfectly content. They were all in good health and had cleared seventy acres of land already. (Hear, hear.)

The time for planting corn had gone by for this season, but when the members of the Monmouth Group got upon the land they should start at once to cultivate such crops as wheat, barley, panicum, sweet potatoes, etc. He would advise them to agree among themselves, and when he came up he hoped to find them in good health and doing well. The main body of the settlers expect to leave Ipswich in about a fortnight.

A correspondent informs as that an advance party of twelve members of the Reliance group left Brisbane on Tuesday, 80th January, by train en route for Roma. Their destination is Rolleston, Springsure district. They take with them six horses, a waggon, and one plough, also other implements and requirements. They are provided with one month's provisions, and after leaving Roma will have to travel with their team about 150 miles. They propose taking the Dawson Road from Roma, and their route will be by the following stations:— Euthulla, Gubberamunda, Myall Downs, and Mount Hutton. To this point they will have the main road.

They intend then to proceed to Boxvale, an out-station of Mount Hutton, which is close to where they will cross the Exhibition Range. They may have to take their waggon to pieces to get through what is called the Gap. Once this difficulty has been surmounted other known obstacles may be more easily overcome. From there they will follow the heads of Comet Downs, and may have to cut a road through a scrub that will lie in their path. There are stations on the way down, and all going well they do not expect to be long before reaching Rolleston. It is the shortest possible route, and known to some of the members of the group who have travelled it previously.

The remaining portion of the group expect to leave Brisbane in about a fortnight or three weeks, by steamer for Rockhampton, whence they will travel by rail to Springsure, and there be met, it is hoped by the pioneers, who will be able to give assistance and information necessary to enable them to get over the fifty miles before their land is reached. This group will have a long pull and a strong pull, and if they pull all together, as they reckon to do, steamer fares or train fares ought not to debar them from making a home for their wives and children, and keeping them out of misery, which surely all have had enough of.

…………………………….

Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Monday 5 February 1894, page 4

The live-stock and drays owned by the Monmouth Group left this town (says the Ipswich Advocate) on Wednesday by road en route for the area set apart for them at Chinchilla. There were twelve horses and about twenty-three head of cattle, as well as three drays, and six sets of harness. Provisions sufficient for two or three weeks have been taken, and, given fine weather, it is expected that the party will reach their new home in a fortnight. The cattle and horses, with one or two exceptions, were in grand condition, and should travel up with very little difficulty. As soon as the drays arrive, the remaining portion of the members of the group will leave town, and they will then have the vehicles to convey them and their be-longings to the land. The secretary has received intimation from the pioneer party, stating that they are all well, and are making themselves as comfortable as possible under the circumstances.

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Western Star and Roma Advertiser (Qld. : 1875 - 1948), Wednesday 14 February 1894, page 2

The Industrial Co-operative Settlement Group of thirty-eight  members, of  which Mr. Floyd is secretary, have accepted the: offer of the Government, 160 acres per member exclusive of roads. The settlement will be established at Warra, near Chinchilla, the land being situated on each side of the railway line.

…………………….

Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 16 February 1894, page 9

The. main body of members and their families of the Monmouth co-operative group were to have left Ipswich this (Tuesday) morning, for the settlement near Chinchilla.

…………………………………………..

Queensland Times, Ipswich Herald and General Advertiser (Qld. : 1861 - 1908), Saturday 24 February 1894, page 7

THE MONMOUTH GROUP AT CHINCHILLA.

Many of your readers would perhaps have liked to hear earlier from us. All and sundry have for once for a long time found themselves with no reason to complain of lack of employment.

On (sic) the journey, by the way of rememberance, will have a permanent residence in our minds. I think, with all the rest of us, that the bit of railway line between Dalby and Chinchilla is fully entitled to the cake. It would not take a lot of hard swearing to award it the bakery. This in no "joke." To classify it as a railway is only a libel. It's only two streaks of rust and a right of way on the pebbles. Imagine a dimly-lighted car, with very little room to spare, full of half sleepy humanity constantly bobbing up and down, with heads making movements towards their neighbors’, as if to whisper something confidential in their ears and the '"kids" giving  sundry yells at times when someone would by accident make a doormat of their little feet. 

But to return: We soon got on the area, though, owing to its survey not being finished, we are residing on a portion most suitable for  the present. Our "houses" were built in a hurry, with few nails, and to the fancy of the owners. Some are neat little structures,  10ft by 12ft., thatched with rushes; others of bags sewn together--a variety sufficient to break the monotony of the similarity. In passing, I may say that they are only temporary abodes.

 The land  consists of undulating ridges, about half-a-mile apart. The creek at present contains an ample supply of splendid water. Our water rates won't encumber us much. The only levy struck is the muscle required in the carriage of it from the creek.

We are erecting a substantial blacksmith's shop, work having already being offered to us. The crash of falling timber as the  ground in cleared, coupled soon with the ring of the blacksmith's anvil, will see

“Something attempted, something done, That has earned a night’s repose."

All are in fairly good health, and satisfied as the choice of the land. The total population at present on the area is 100, but we shall soon have an addition to the century.

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Warwick Argus (Qld. : 1879 - 1901), Saturday 3 March 1894, page 3

The MIZPAR GROUP.-Mr. T. H. Fellows, ; secretary of the Mizpah Group, writes to the Courier as follows from Chinchilla on the 20th February-

 I noticed in your Issue of Thursday last, a paragraph stating that the Mizpah Group are seeking additional State aid.

At this is calculated to convey a wrong impression to your readers, I beg to say there has been no formal application made in any shape to the Minister. Whoever your informant may be, he is altogether at sea. I am not prepared at present to say what our intentions may be, but when the time arrives, I think it will be quite time enough for the papers to take it up, and say what they have to say when they have got a foundation to work  upon. Until that time arrives, I think it rather unfair for them to comment (in this case at all events) on what is not the truth."

The Minister for Lands, in reply to a question yesterday, stated that the information published last week was quite correct, application  for further assistance having been made, although in an indirect way.

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Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Saturday 3 March 1894, page 2

Industrial Group.  Government Terms Accepted.

The Industrial Group, one of the first formed under the Co-operative Communities Land Settlement Act, have accepted an area of land in  the  parish of Earle, near Warra station, Southern and  Western Railway, and, on both sides of the line, equal to 160 acres per member. The group, which has a membership of about 38, will receive assistance from the Government to the amount of £12 per member, and they will have 12 years in which to acquire the freehold of the land they intend to settle upon. It was originally the intention of this group to be independent of monetary-assistance  from the Government, but owing to the time that has elapsed since the first stops  were taken to form the group, and. the consequent deminution of individual funds, the members decided that it would be wise to apply for monetary assistance, as other groups had  done. The group will now make application for recognition as a group under the above conditions.

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By His Excellency Sir HENRY WYLIE NORMAN Kight Grand Cross of the Most Honourable of the Bath, Knight Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, Companion of the Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Colony of Queensland and its Dependencies.

 

In pursuance and execution of all powers and authorities in me vested under the provisions of " The Co-operative Communities Land settlement Act of 1893," I, Sir HENRY WYLIE NORMAN, the Governor aforesaid, by and with the advice of the Executive Council, do, by this my Proclamation, set apart the Area hereinafter mentioned for the purposes of

a Group, subject to the particulars and conditions hereinafter contained, that is to say :-

E.M.-14-3-94.

 

SCHEDULE.

1. The name of the Group shall be " The Industrial Group."

 

2. The names of the persons included in the said Group are as follows-

1. William Floyd

20. Christopher Watson

 

2. Charles Holloway

21. Samuel Wilkinson

 

3. James Snell

22. Joseph Armour Dickie

 

4. William Thomas Smith

23. George Clydesdale

 

5. Gilbert Robert Stuckey

24. Henry William Coleman

 

6. Walter Booth

25. Richard Burke

 

7. Charles Stott

26. Arthur William Wildman

 

8. Charles Jacob Gay

27. John Floyd

 

9. Anders Pedersen

28. Henry Jones

 

10. Frank Schneiderwin

29. George Melrose

 

11. Ferdinand Neumann

30. John Griffiths

 

12. Henry Wildman

31. John Stott

 

13. Jose Chambers

32. Andrew McIntyre

 

14. George Wildman

33. Samuel Lang

 

15. Peter Lynch

34. Charles McCarthy

 

16. George Weston

35. John Alexander Burke

 

17. John Scaife

36. Francis Brown

 

18. James Collins

37. Michael Cassidy

 

19. Francis Round

38. Isaac Gaze.

 

 

3. (a.) The area shall be about 6,500 acres, in the parish of Earle, Dalby Land Agent's District, comprised within the boundaries hereinafter described:-

Commencing on the right bank of Cooranga Creek at the south-west corner of portion

1258, and bounded thence on the east by that portion bearing north and west to its north-east corner ; thence by a line bearing north crossing the Western Railway Line about X30 chains ;

thence on the north by a line north-westerly parallel to the Western Railway Line and distant about 94 chains therefrom about 200 chains ; thence on the west by a line bearing south

crossing the railway line and passing along the east boundary of portion 1779 to the Condamine River ; and thence on the south by that river and Cooranga Creek upwards to the point of commencement ;-exclusive of freehold portions 189 and 1257 and inclusive of land required for roads, reserves, or other public purpose.

(b.) Each member will be permitted to acquire the freehold of any area, not exceeding 130 acres, at the expiration of the period hereinafter mentioned.

4. The sum of ten shillings per acre shall be expended by the said Group in making improvements on the said area, and such improvements shall be of a substantial and permanent nature to the satisfaction of the Minister.

5. (a.) The said area shall be set apart for a period of twelve years from the First day of January, 1894. (b.) Rent shall be paid by the said Group on 6,080 acres at the rate of tenpence per acre per annum for the whole of the said period, payable in equal instalments at the end of each of the six latter years of the said period, and shall be accounted as the purchasing price for the acquisition of the freehold of the said area or any part thereof at the end of the said period,

6. The said period shall be divided into four equal portions of three years, and within three months before the expiration of every such portion during the said period an inspection of the

improvements on the said area will be made by the Commissioner.

7. (a.) Timber may be cut by any member of the said Group on the subdivision of the said area, occupied by him for the purpose of making improvements thereon, but not for sale.

(b.) Timber can only be cut on the unoccupied portion of the said area by permission of the Commissioner , but no timber shall in any case be cut for sale by the members of the said

Group.

(r.) The total money aid under section 33 shall be £456, repayable , on demand , within the first three years of the said period . with 5 per centum per annum interest added.

(d.) No allowances will be made to individual members of the said Group under section 34.

 

Given under my Hand and Seal, of Government House, Brisbane , this fourteenth day of March. in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninetyfour, and in the fifty -seventh year of Her Majesty's reign.

By Command, A. H. BARLOW.

……………………………………………………….

Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Saturday 17 March 1894, page 6

Mizpah Group. Visited by Major Jeffries. The Major Interviewed.

Major Jeffries, who has just returned from a visit to the Mizpah co-operative community at Chinchilla, was interviewed  yesterday afternoon by a Telegraph representative, with the object of ascertaining what progress the settlement had made during the three months its numbers had been located there. It will be  remembered that the Mizpah group was formed from members of the Salvation Army, and though the officers of the army have nothing to do with the management of the group, they naturally feel more than ordinary interest in the success of those who belong to the organisation . The major, who was accompanied on his visit by Staff-captain Pearce, was found in his office in the Temple yesterday afternoon, and being plied with questions, gave the following account of what he saw and heard in the course of his trip : —

You must know, said the major, that the primary object of my visit to the south-west was to marry a couple of our officers at Toowoomba, and being naturally interested in the group we went on to Chinchilla, where the community is located.

The settlement, as you know, is 2 and a half miles from the township of Chinchilla, and is 4,000 acres in extent. It has a railway frontage of nearly 3 miles, and has also a frontage of a mile to Charley's Creek, while there are several fine lagoons in different parts, so that they are well supplied with water.

The group comprises 35 families, numbering in all 156 souls. There are only five single men in the group, and all the married men have been accompanied by their wives and families, the family in some instances being represented by seven and eight children.

The soil varies a good deal, but is principally a red loam, and is said to be very suitable for wheat culture. In fact, it is in the centre of the wheat-growing area recommended by Professor Shelton. It is proposed to go in largely for the cultivation of wheat at the proper season.

Since the group arrived on the ground they have cleared and grubbed 26 acres, and although it is not what you would call heavily timbered country, their work represents a good deal of hard toil. Twelve acres have been ploughed, five being put under corn, and the balance under potatoes.

Then they are preparing about 13 acres which they intend planting with grapes for the purpose of making raisins. At least half a dozen men of the group are practical farmers, and supply in experience what perhaps some of their companions lack as agriculturists. There are selectors around the settlement who willingly give what advice they can to the pioneers of this new form of settlement.

The appearance of the settlement is decidedly encouraging, looking at the matter from the standpoint of those who watch with interest the progress of this movement. It has an air of permanency about it which shows that they have come to stay. A mile of very substantial post and rail fence has been put up, and about 40 chains of " dog leg " have also been erected.

When the group went up, they balloted as to whose house should be first erected, and about half a dozen substantial slab humpies have been put up, and provide accommodation much more convenient than the ordinary tents, which are still the habitation of the majority of the Mizpahites.

Two stores, boot-maker's shop, butcher's shop, black-smith's forge, and a committee room have also been erected, and a small stockyard has been fenced off.

They have five cows, seven horses, and two pigs of their own. In addition to that, cows have been lent them from the adjoining stations, on the condition that they are broken in to handle. From the milk obtained from these cows they make butter, which assists them not a little. The bootmaker not only does all the trade for the settlement, but he has secured a large amount of business from Chinchilla, and the profits of his labours go into the communal purse. The hides of the beasts they kill are sent to Toowoomba, and exchanged for leather.

Some of the members of the group had a little money of their own, and they have started a private store, from which adjoining selectors and others make their purchases. The profits of this business are also common to the whole group. They have also secured a mail contract from Chinchilla to Durrah, for which they get £30, payable quarterly, and the men do whatever work they can get in the neighbourhood. The morning I was there two men started out for  Chinchilla to build a house.

They have laid out the settlement very well on a rise near the Chinchilla side of the area. Each man has an acre of ground around his house, and is allowed to cultivate vegetables and such like things for his own private use. They start work in the morning at half-past 7 o'clock and knock off at half-past 5, with an hour's spell at midday. A committee of eight, including the chairman and secretary of the group, manage the business generally. They decide what work is to be done, who are to do it, and the foreman sees that it is done. The spirit manifested by the men is really beautiful, and the foreman told me that he had not heard a note of dissatisfaction during the whole time they have been there.

And I can tell you it is roughing to an extent not perhaps thought of by those who have not visited such a settlement. The majority of them are still living in tents, and for a family of seven or eight, and in some cases more, the accommodation is neither luxurious nor extensive. However, they are putting up with their hardships in a first rate spirit, though some of them, especially the women folk, have been used to more ease and comfort than they can hope to get there for some time.

If the experiment can be made a success, I am sure they will make it. They seem very hopeful, but still a little anxious as to what the Government will do in regard to their application for the advancing of the balance of the £20 provided by the Act.

And here let me say that I do not know what they will do if the Government do not advance them some more money. They have, as you know, received £12 per family. Of that amount they spent £50 for tents, £60 for implements, and £50 for horses. I might explain here that at the start Mr. J. T. Bell, the member for the district, lent the group a great deal of assistance by providing horses, and toward that gentleman, who is taking a great interest in the group, they entertain the kindliest feelings. Well, after stocking their stores and purchasing necessary articles of food, they have very nearly gone through the balance of the money which was advanced to them.  They live in the most economical way, as you will say when I tell you that the average cost per member is 1s. 7 and a half pence per week. They could live on even a little less than that, too,  I am told, but at that rate it is but the plainest of living. They want assistance there-fore to keep them going for the next four or five mouths, till their crops mature, and by that time they expect to be able to reap some substantial return for their labour. Unless they get some help, I really do not see how they are going to carry on, and it would really be a pity to see them go down for the sake of a few extra pounds. I should say from my knowledge of the work, that every penny advanced by the Government is already represented in the improvements which have been effected, and if a capable officer were sent to inspect the settlement, I feel certain that he could not help reporting favourably on behalf of the group. I sincerely hope that the extra advance will be made.

We had a fine meeting one night there, about 300 persons being present. Many came from the Monmouth Group, which adjoins the Mizpah Group, and people even came from Chinchilla.

I may tell you also that application has been made for a provisional school, and the application has been granted.  A piece of ground has been reserved for the purpose of the Mizpah settlement. The group have undertaken to erect the school, the department to find the material, such as galvanised iron for roofing, which is not readily obtainable there. And while on this subject I would like to refer in conclusion to a matter which caused me a little sadness. Many of the children are now not overburdened with clothing, and when winter comes, they will be sure to suffer a good deal. I am trying to collect some clothes for them, and I shall be exceedingly glad if any of your readers can lend me assistance in this matter. 

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